Ancient Greek art was collected in ancient Rome, studied during the Renaissance and formalized in the 19th century. It is the most influential art ever made.

This tutorial traces the representation of the human body in monumental Greek sculpture from the earliest Egyptian influence to the increasing naturalism that lays the foundation for the Classical style.

The Early Classical style describes the trends in Greek sculpture between c. 490 and 450 B.C.E. Artistically this stylistic phase represents a transition from the rather austere and static Archaic style of the sixth century B.C.E. to the more idealized Classical style.

The late Classical style during the early 4th century was a time of experimentation and transition away from the strict canonical ideals of the high Classical moment.

Alexander the Great died in 323 B.C.E. leaving a vast empire to his generals, the Diadochi (successors). The Diadochi divided Alexander's empire amongst themselves—the Hellenistic dynasties of the Seleucids in the Near East, the Ptolemies in Egypt, the Antigonids in Macedonia, and the wealthy Attalid kings of Pergamon who ruled most of western Asia Minor. Greek culture flourished across an enormous area, but at the same time, these "Hellenized" peoples infused Greek art with a drama and breadth beyond anything the Greeks had previously produced.