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Maslow's hierarchy of needs

According to Maslow's hierarchy of needs, humans must fulfill five levels of needs in a specific order. Basic needs like food, water, and safety are at the bottom of the hierarchy, while higher-level needs like love, self-esteem, and self-actualization are at the top. Created by Shreena Desai.

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  • piceratops ultimate style avatar for user Roman Smirnov
    In the modern world, people are expected to achieve self actualization while they're still young, meaning mostly at the base of Maslow's pyramid. You rarely see older more secure people go out and change the world (Sal Khan risked his family's safety while starting Khan Academy).

    How does this perceived trend conflict with Maslow's pyramid, if at all?
    (15 votes)
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    • aqualine ultimate style avatar for user David
      Interesting point, I would note that Maslow's pyramid is an assessment of the present. An individual cannot progress to the next level at that moment. Sal Khan starting Khan Academy certainly risked his family's safety, but Sal still had those basic needs satisfied at that moment, allowing him to progress up to the more complex tiers. However, the addition of that temporal component as well as one's perception of reality is intriguing and points to potential limitations of Maslow's idea.
      (12 votes)
  • piceratops ultimate style avatar for user Jedburgh80
    Can you regress to lower level even when those needs have previously been fulfilled? Do you have to climb the hierarchy sequentially?
    (2 votes)
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    • blobby green style avatar for user BfreeXI
      I think the idea is--you cannot obtain the higher levels unless the lower levels are fulfilled. So, you would have to climb it sequentially. I suppose you could regress--if you're suddenly homeless and can't buy food, you won't have the first level of the hierarchy met and there is no way you can think about self-actualizing without those.
      (4 votes)
  • blobby green style avatar for user matt.rosenblum0105
    Maslow added more to his theory later in his career- he added cognitive and aesthetic needs, as well as others. Maybe we can add more?
    (3 votes)
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  • male robot hal style avatar for user Enn
    Is the Maslow's Hierarchy of needs still used by psychologist ?
    (1 vote)
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  • leaf blue style avatar for user Muhammad Noaman
    can we have love without safety..??
    (0 votes)
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    • leafers ultimate style avatar for user Jordan Hall
      I think that is most certainly possible. I work for a non profit that serves the poor. I would says that many of the poor people we "love" 1. actually feel loved, feel a sense of belonging, but also 2. don't necessarily have the safety needs down (though most of them do have a certain measure of safety, just not a subjectively defined satisfactory level of safety).

      Other interesting examples are that of cults. Often in cults people sacrifice their physiological and safety needs for the sake of belonging. Early Christianity (which was more of a cult than a religion at that time) exhibited such behavior to an extent. Early Christians seemed to not be as concerned about basic needs as they were about being in the Kingdom of God (which probably had to do with the "esteem" and "self-actualization" levels in addition to the "love" level). Evidence is in the fact that they were often tortured, starved, beaten, deprived, and martyred.

      Your question just sparked these thoughts of mine. Hope you enjoy them.
      (3 votes)
  • blobby green style avatar for user 11764
    how did he put the proteges together
    (1 vote)
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  • blobby green style avatar for user UberPickles
    this video has some intense asmr
    (1 vote)
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  • male robot hal style avatar for user Michael Tu
    So according to Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs, if you don't have a good health, you can't get to the next level of love and acceptance. But what about those with diseases like cancer? I'm pretty sure that they're capable of love and creativity. Can someone please explain?
    (0 votes)
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    • leaf green style avatar for user Ayesha Ayaz
      That's basically the main criticism against Maslow's theory. It assumes that everyone has the same needs and can be satisfied in the same way. One of the limitations of Maslow's theory is that individuals have different needs and they are not necessarily in the hierarchical order suggested by Maslow.
      (1 vote)
  • aqualine ultimate style avatar for user catherine.kulandairaj
    Is there one more person like Maslow in the World?
    (0 votes)
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  • blobby green style avatar for user Adesola Adewale Waheed
    does this change the behavior of humans or what?
    (0 votes)
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Video transcript

So we talked about before that there's five approaches in understanding motivation. And one of these approaches is called Maslow's hierarchy of needs. And it's actually broken down into a pyramid. So it looks just like this. And it was created by famous psychologist named Maslow. So Maslow said that we have needs that need to be fulfilled in a specific order. And it has to start from the bottom of the pyramid all the way to the top. So our most basic need is our physiological need. So this can include anything from food, water, breathing, sleep. All of these are essential needs to survive, basically. The second level is our need for safety, so safety of resources, safety of employment, safety in our health, property. So all of these are basic needs as well. But they can only be fulfilled when our physiological needs are fulfilled. So we call these two levels the basic levels. Now, he went on to name a third level, and this is our level of love, our need for love, our need to belong, our need to have friends and family. So this level of needs is what we call our social needs. The fourth level is our need for esteem, self-esteem. So we like to feel confident and have a sense of achievement in what we do. So this level is called our level of respect. We like to gain respect from others when we reach this level. And the last level is called self-actualization. It's a big word, but it's basically our need for wanting morality, a sense of morality, a need for acceptance and also creativity. So we call this our full potential. So think of this as climbing Mount Everest. You have to start at the bottom. But then, along the way, you're going to have different checkpoints. Each of these checkpoints are managed by all the Sherpas on the mountain. You can't go from the bottom to the next level unless you check in with the Sherpa, and he makes sure that you're OK, you've eaten properly, you're getting enough rest, and only then can you jump to the next level. Again, a Sherpa there at the higher level is going to check and make sure you're breathing OK, you're getting enough oxygen, and so on. So you get to the next checkpoint and the next checkpoint, and finally, you're at the top, where you've realized your maximum potential. So this is called Maslow's hierarchy of human needs.