Byzantine (late Roman Empire)

Constantinople (now Istanbul) was the capital of the late Roman empire, but its ethereal mosaics, ivories, and metalwork often depart from classical naturalism.

A beginner's guide to Byzantine art and culture

Learn about the Byzantine Iconoclasm and how it shapes the Byzantine art that remains today.
Article
A beginner's guide to Byzantine Art
Article
Iconoclastic controversies

Constantinople and the East

This tutorial focuses on Byzantine art made in the east, what is today Greece, Turkey, and the Middle East.
11:04
Hagia Sophia, Istanbul
Hagia Sophia, Istanbul, 532-37 (architects: Isidore of Miletus and Anthemius of Tralles) A conversation with Dr. Steven Zucker and Dr. Beth Harris
Article
Hagia Sophia, Istanbul
Essay by Dr. William Allen
5:01
Theotokos mosaic, apse, Hagia Sophia, Istanbul
Theotokos mosaic, 867, apse, Hagia Sophia, Istanbul Speakers: Dr. Steven Zucker and Dr. Beth Harris
5:09
Deësis mosaic, Hagia Sophia, Istanbul
Deësis (Christ with the Virgin Mary and John the Baptist), c. 1261, mosaic, imperial enclosure, south gallery, Hagia Sophia, Istanbul Speakers: Dr. Beth Harris and Dr. Steven Zucker
Exercise
Hagia Sophia (quiz)
Test your knowledge.
6:48
Hagia Sophia as a mosque
This video focuses on Hagia Sophia after the conquest of Constantinople by the Ottomans in 1453. Speakers: Dr. Elizabeth Macaulay-Lewis and Dr. Steven Zucker
Article
Virgin (Theotokos) and Child between Saints Theodore and George
4:25
Ivory panel with Archangel
Byzantine panel with archangel, Ivory leaf from diptych, c. 525-50, 16.8 x 5.6 x 0.35 in. (42.8 x 14.3 x 0.9 cm), probably from Constantinople (modern Istanbul, Turkey), (British Museum, London) The British Museum translates the text at the top of the panel as: "Receive the suppliant before you, despite his sinfulness." Speakers: Dr. Beth Harris, Dr. Steven Zucker
Article
The Paris Psalter
Essay by Dr. Anne McClanan 
6:21
Icon of the Triumph of Orthodoxy
Icon of the Triumph of Orthodoxy (Byzantine), c. 1400, tempera and gold on wood, 39 cm x 31 cm (British Museum, London) Speakers: Pippa Couch and Rachel Ropeik