7th grade (U.S.)

7th grade takes much of what you learned in 6th grade to an entirely new level. In particular, you'll now learn to do everything with negative numbers (we're talking everything--adding, subtracting, multiplying, dividing, fractions, decimals... everything!). You'll also take your algebraic skills to new heights by tackling two-step equations. 7th grade is also when you start thinking about probability (which is super important for realizing that casinos and lotteries are really just ways of taking money away from people who don't know probability) and dig deeper into the world of data and statistics. Onward! (Content was selected for this grade level based on a typical curriculum in the United States.)
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Rates, proportional relationships, and ratios

Throughout your day you probably encounter situations where you need to compare two numbers using the same or different units of measurement. Perhaps you want to know how many math problems you can complete in an hour…or how many scoops of ice cream you get out of a gallon bucket. In this set of tutorials you will learn about rate, a special ratio in which two terms are expressed in different units of measurement, and about proportional relationships, how one variable changes in proportion to another. You will practice solving problems and then construct a few of your own.

Negative numbers: addition and subtraction

Add and subtract negative numbers, and see how absolute value can be used to find the distance between any two numbers on the number line.

Negative numbers: multiplication and division

Learn to multiply and divide negative numbers. Once you've got the basics down, we'll revisit fractions, exponents, and order or operations but this time with negatives!

Fractions, decimals, and percentages

In these tutorials, we'll explore the number system. We'll convert fractions to decimals, operate on numbers in different forms, meet complex fractions, and identify types of numbers. We'll also solve interesting word problems involving percentages (discounts, taxes, and tip calculations).

Algebraic expressions, equations, and inequalities

Bring on the algebra! Learn how to manipulate expressions and solve equations and inequalities.

Geometry

Why is geometry important? It's all about shapes -- triangles, circles, pyramids, spheres, diamonds, and more. Geometric shapes are all around you, and the world is built with them. In this series of tutorials and exercises you'll become familiar with Euclidean geometry and terms like segments, scale drawings, parts of a circle, area, volume, angles, and geometric figures.

Statistics and probability

This introduction to probability and statistics explores probability models, sample spaces, compound events, random samples, and a whole lot more.

Rates, proportional relationships, and ratios

Throughout your day you probably encounter situations where you need to compare two numbers using the same or different units of measurement. Perhaps you want to know how many math problems you can complete in an hour…or how many scoops of ice cream you get out of a gallon bucket. In this set of tutorials you will learn about rate, a special ratio in which two terms are expressed in different units of measurement, and about proportional relationships, how one variable changes in proportion to another. You will practice solving problems and then construct a few of your own.
Community Questions
All content in “Rates, proportional relationships, and ratios”

Rates

It can be useful to measure 2 things, but in different units of measurement, and then express that difference as a special ratio. Essentially, this is the definition of rate. We might compare how far a car drives with how long it takes to get to a destination, and then express it as miles per hour. Or perhaps we want to compare the cost of different size bags of jellybeans, which can be expressed as dollars per pound. You get the idea. This tutorial helps you understand these fundamental applications of rate. Common Core Standard: 7.RP.A.1

Proportional relationships

The concept of proportionality is pivotal to our understanding of how things in the universe are contructed. Proportional relationships in mathematics examine relationships between two equal ratios. For example, perhaps you're painting your bedroom and need to know how to mix 2 colors together to create a third color. Understanding the ratio of color 1 to color 2 determines your ability to know how many cans of both colors you need to paint your whole room in color 3. Pay attention because you'll find that these ideas will keep popping up in your life! Common Core Standards: 7.RP.A.2, 7.RP.A.2a, 7.RP.A.2b, 7.RP.A.2c, 7.RP.A.2d

Constructing proportions

Your knowledge of ratios has extended into understanding proportions. (If not, back up and be sure you get it!) Now that we know what a proportional relationship is, let's construct some real problems to solve. In this group of tutorials we'll practice writing and solving proportions, with both known and unknown variables. Common Core Standards: 7.RP.A.2, 7.RP.A.3