Decimals

In this topic, we will learn what a decimal is and how to show it visually and on a number line. We will also add, subtract, multiply, and divide with decimals.
See how you score on these 18 practice questions

You get the general idea of decimals and what the digits in different places represent (place value). Now you're ready to do something with the decimals. Adding and subtracting is a good place to start. This will allow you to add your family's expenses to figure out if your little brother is laundering money (perhaps literally). Have fun! Common Core Standard: 5.NBT.B.7

Honestly, once you remember one very important rule, the rest of adding and subtracting decimals is a snap. That rule is to be sure and align your decimals first. In this tutorial, you'll get a chance to practice this with us and become fluent adding decimals. We'll tackle subtracting decimals in the next tutorial.

The real world is seldom about whole numbers. If you precisely measure anything, you're likely to get a decimal. If you don't know how to multiply these decimals, then you won't be able to do all the powerful things that multiplication can do in the real world (figure out your commission as a robot possum salesperson, determining how much shag carpet you need for your secret lair, etc.).

You've already multiplied decimals in the 5th grade. We'll show you some ways to handle slightly more complicated problems. Now you'll become super good at it with a bit more practice! Common Core Standard: 6.NS.B.3

In this tutorial, we'll extend our division skills to include decimals! We get into some pretty fun stuff here including dividing decimals by whole numbers, and dividing whole numbers by decimals. Finally...dividing decimals by decimals. Common Core Standard 5.NBT.B.7

There is a strong temptation in life to appear precise, even when you are aren't accurate. If you precisely measure one dimension of a carpet to be 3.256 meters and eyeball the other dimensional to be "roughly 2 meters", can you really claim that the area is 6.512 square meters (3.256 x 2)? Isn't that a little misleading? This tutorial gets us thinking about this conundrum and gives us the best practices that scientists and engineers use to not mislead each other.