Problem

Intelligence is a complex subject that includes the ability to learn, to define problems, and to solve problems. Intelligent quotient tests (also known as IQ tests) attempt to quantify how smart a person is relative to the general population, but fail to account for different types of intelligence, like the ability to understand others or be introspective. A psychology professor believes that the ability to identify and cater to different types of intelligence is especially important in learning environments. He decides to administer a test at the start of the semester that measures different types of intelligences, so that he can create lessons and projects that match students’ abilities. He believes this will increase the likelihood of student success.
The test he administers identifies a primary type of intelligence for each student; they are matched to one of four categories: bodily-kinesthetic intelligence (the ability to use the physical body), interpersonal intelligence (the ability to sense the feelings of others and respond appropriately), intrapersonal intelligence (the ability to know one’s own body and mind), and linguistic intelligence (the ability to communicate well or speak languages). As the semester goes on, he finds that most of his students are failing his class despite the modifications to his lesson plans and customized projects. He decides to re-administer the intelligence test. Table 1 outlines how many students fit into each intelligence category at the start of the semester (Time A) and at the follow up point (Time B).
Table 1
Intelligence typeTime ATime B
Bodily-kinesthetic1012
Interpersonal1514
Intrapersonal1318
Linguistic126
Based on the passage and the results outlined in Table 1, what can the professor conclude about the intelligence test?
Please choose from one of the following options.
Get 5 answers correct in a row