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Student story: Standardized tests

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  • blobby blue style avatar for user Pragati
    What are some really good SAT math prep books?
    (4 votes)
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    • aqualine tree style avatar for user David Alexander
      If you're located in the USA, there are plenty of these books for sale at used book places like Thriftbooks or Betterworldbooks or places like that. It may be "last year's" edition, but selling for $5 is a lot cheaper than a new one for $25. The advantage to having your own book is also that you can write in it, which you can't do if you borrow one from the public library.
      (2 votes)
  • blobby blue style avatar for user Pragati
    Should I take the SAT or the ACT?
    (I am a little confused.)
    (4 votes)
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  • duskpin seed style avatar for user Natalia
    How can I find time to study in between all my AP and Honors classes AND a sport?
    (2 votes)
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  • blobby green style avatar for user Maizeandblue
    I am a freshman in high school and I am just looking at things that will help me later on, any advice?
    (2 votes)
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    • leafers seedling style avatar for user 15pinkfish
      Study hard from the beginning. Try lots of different things so you can get an idea of what you would like to major in. Be yourself, follow your own interests, even if people say they won't make any money. I was interested in art for the longest time, and then I took an architecture class just for the fun of it, and here I am on a road to architecture school. Bottom line: don't be afraid.
      (2 votes)
  • leaf green style avatar for user Tahj Gordon
    Hey, my name is Tahj and I live in Jamaica. My school system is different from America's apparently. In Jamaica, high school ranges from grade 7 to grade 11 .. And then there's grade 12 and 13 which are optional, which is really equivalent to a community college. I am going into grade 11 and I've watched these videos on how to prepare for college. I see people talking about AP courses, honors and all of that .. I am not acquainted with what that is and I am wondering if I will be penalize when I apply for universities in America. I am however meeting certain criteria though, because I have learned Algebra 1, 2, Geometry, Trigonometry etc etc .. The only math course that I haven't learned is Calculus which is offered in grade 12 and 13 which are optional at my school. I am really contemplating whether or not I should go to 12 and 13 grade. Should I? And take the Calculus course before I apply to university? I understand that in America, grade 12 is mandatory, and in my country it is optional. So please try and put yourself in my shoe, so my question can be answered. Other than not having Calculus . I do meet the other criteria like having a foreign language, taking English, all three sciences etc etc. So to repeat my question. Should I go to grade 12 which is optional to learn Calculus before I apply to any university at all?
    (2 votes)
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    • leafers seed style avatar for user mscynthiamccabe
      Hi Tahj. I'm a high school teacher in the US. I would say that it really depends on what you are interested in studying in the future. If you are at all leaning towards a math/science career, it would be to your advantage to do the extra grade 12 Calculus. Calculus at the college level is usually a 2 year course, and a prerequisite for classes like Physics. It is also typically much more intense at the college level, at least in the US. If you know for certain that you want to be, for example, an Art History major, than the lack of extra Calculus prep won't hurt you. If you're are at all on the fence, then it might be better to take the extra couple of years to figure out what interests you, without paying the much higher college fees during that time. As for the Honors/AP situation: Honors classes are typically meant to prepare students for AP classes, which are classes that are certified as being taught at the university level, even though they are taught in high school. Students take an exam at the end of the year which, if their scores are high enough, can qualify them to skip certain introductory university level classes, Even if you have not taken the AP class, because it isn't offered at your school, you can still take the test. Check out the College Board website (https://www.collegeboard.org/) to find out more. Best of luck!
      (2 votes)
  • blobby green style avatar for user Dora Asiedu
    What is the difference between the SAT and ACT
    (2 votes)
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  • mr pink red style avatar for user Anu :)
    Is it necessary or beneficial to take preparation classes for either test?
    (2 votes)
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    • aqualine tree style avatar for user Jean Tsuentana
      No, it certainly isn't necessary. I have several friends who took the SAT classes, and it affected them in various degrees. For me, I didn't benefit from my own tutoring in CR and W - merely because I'm stubborn, and my best friend's sister (who is a genius) also didn't benefit - but she's crazy smart, so that factors in. I have another friends who took SAT classes and benefited. However, the bottom line is this: you only benefit from your strategy. If you have a strategy that allows you to do well, great. I self-studied like crazy for my CR, and I benefited. You need to have the tenacity to do well.
      (2 votes)
  • piceratops ultimate style avatar for user Hermione Granger
    What SAT prep books are good?
    (2 votes)
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    • duskpin ultimate style avatar for user kendra
      I can personally recommend Princeton Review's "Cracking" books. They have a lot, including "Cracking the New SAT", "Cracking the PSAT", "Cracking the ACT", "Crash Course for the SAT", and a lot more! Some of the books have practice tests in them, and all of them are really good and have a lot of helpful tips.
      Hope this helps you!
      (2 votes)
  • blobby green style avatar for user jonesjahe
    should i retake the ACT if i barely pass it?
    (2 votes)
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    • female robot amelia style avatar for user Johanna
      You cannot pass or fail the ACT. You can figure out what score you want to try for by looking up the ACT statistics for students admitted to any colleges you might like.

      If you want a higher score, and the time and money needed are okay for you, you could retake the ACT. Also make sure that you could submit the score in time for colleges to review.
      (2 votes)
  • piceratops ultimate style avatar for user Anthony Han
    Is the psat the practice sat?
    (2 votes)
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Video transcript

- Personally, I'm not really a big test-taker, so one of my biggest fears was being really scared and anxious when I would take the tests. But then I took a step back and really reflected on, well, how am I going to give my best? I'm really close friends with a lot of girls, and thankfully, we love to study together, so that was good to have people to rely on, and it was also important to not just take the tests once, but take it multiple times, so that we can just practice through longer periods of times. And we gave each other more than a month just to prepare. Preparation doesn't just happen overnight or in a couple weeks, but really understanding this is the date when the test comes, and this is how long we're going to prepare for it. And with me, I decided to take both the SAT and ACT, because I wanted to see whether I had a higher score in another test such as the ACT.