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Series load

Why does the deflection change when an electromagnet is attached to the circuit? Does it matter what side of the electromagnet we test? Created by Brit Cruise.

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  • leaf red style avatar for user Jack McClelland
    I've heard the terms "in series" and "in parallel", can someone help me understand the difference between the two and what they mean?
    (7 votes)
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  • leafers tree style avatar for user Tiny tim
    Hot acid again in ?
    (1 vote)
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  • blobby green style avatar for user faheem uddin
    what is difference between resistance and resistivity?
    (1 vote)
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    • duskpin ultimate style avatar for user 🚀The knowledge Hunter🔭
      In simple, you could understood resistance by using a simple analogy, which would also lead to understand the Law of Resistivity and the Unit of Resistivity. So, Suppose you are moving through a narrow path, and a lot of guys are coming on the opposite direction, which is letting you to slow down. But, Imagine if the path was too wide you would easily go through them. But, If its too long, the rush of people will slow you down along with a lot of Distance. Similar, in a movement of Charges through a wire :-
      You are the Charge, which is moving by the potential difference created by the batter. But, there are some bad guys who are resisting you to slow down(these guys can also be good sometime) which is resistance. And, if you somehow manage to squeeze through them, it would take time but, if the path was wider, you could easily move in a fast speed.
      There fore, we have reached the Equation,

       Resistance = Potential Difference / Current
      R = V/I

      Scientifically Resistance is the opposition that a substance offers to the flow of electric current. The standard unit of resistance is the ohm, sometimes written out as a word, and sometimes symbolized by the uppercase Greek letter omega (Ω). When an electric current of one ampere passes through a component across which a potential difference (voltage) of one volt exists, then the resistance of that component is one ohm.
      And as i have said above, through a long path, you would have to go slowly, since there are along way to travel and so many guys to conquer, but if the way was wider, its pretty easier to escape fast
       So, we have reached our second equation, 
      Resistance is directly proportional to Length of wire and inversely proportional to the area of cross section.
      R ∝ l/a
      So, we use a constant of proportionality ρ (Which is unit of Resistivity) to remove the proportionality sign so, R = ρ * l/a
      So, ρ = R*a/l = Ω* m^2 / m => Ωm
      So, Si unit of resistivity is Ωm.

      Scientifically , its a measure of the resisting power of a specified material to the flow of an electric current.
      (3 votes)
  • duskpin ultimate style avatar for user 🚀The knowledge Hunter🔭
    What are the advantages of parallel Combination of resistors to Series Combination?
    (2 votes)
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  • leaf green style avatar for user Rishabh Baid
    We know in a electric heater high resistance wire is used as H is proportional to I^2rt.why a low resistance wire not used so that heat produced would increase withI^2
    (2 votes)
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    • primosaur ultimate style avatar for user Mixa05el
      In fact, it is used, which is why heaters have much lower resistance than other appliances.
      If you want to know why it's not lower, the efficiency of the heater is approximately equal to R/(R+r), where r is the internal resistance of the grid, so if a lower resistance wire is used, the efficiency is much lower. In addition, if the resistance is too low, the current can be higher than the maximum permitted and can damage the wires.
      (1 vote)
  • primosaur ultimate style avatar for user Asaad Khattab
    So connecting the battery has a larger affect than connecting the electromagnet?
    (1 vote)
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    • leaf blue style avatar for user Stephen Brand
      The battery was still connected, there was just an additional load (the electromagnet) added to the circuit. The wires were partially not shown in the video, but if you follow the connections assuming that each wire completes the circuit, it makes more sense.
      (2 votes)
  • piceratops ultimate style avatar for user carlos narvaez
    why did you end the video
    (1 vote)
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  • aqualine ultimate style avatar for user CTA914
    what type of liquid is he pouring into the cup?
    (1 vote)
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  • winston default style avatar for user adinsx0001
    Why are you testing needle deflection around the coil? Wasn't that a large coil of wire (inductor) that you connected in series? Wouldn't this affect the experiment and how much the needle deflects by the inductors magnetic field and where its located as opposed to just the pressence of the new resistance?
    (0 votes)
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  • duskpin ultimate style avatar for user Ria Golez
    At why did Sal disconnect the battery from the alligator clips?
    (0 votes)
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Video transcript