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2D equilibrium -- balancing games

How does everything even out? Learn what 2D Equilibrium is and how it effects the balance of life. Created by MIT+K12.

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  • winston baby style avatar for user Fatih
    Where can i get that tool in ?
    (11 votes)
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  • male robot donald style avatar for user Function 97
    At how do temperature and pressure change the equilibrium of an object?
    (6 votes)
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  • aqualine tree style avatar for user Tanpaw
    so the left side is 2D and it had 2W than the right side can be 1/2D and 5W?
    (3 votes)
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    • orange juice squid orange style avatar for user Tonya Prim
      No, both sides have to equal out. 2D times 2W equals 4 DW because 2 x 2 = 4 and D times W equals DW. (Since they are letters, you show that they are multiplied times each other by just placing them next to each other.). If you have 1/2 D on the right side, you would need 8 W on the right side too for it to balance. 1/2 times (or, in other words, one-half of ) 8 equals 4. It might help you to understand it if you can make a similar balance at home and experiment with different weights and distances.
      (4 votes)
  • piceratops ultimate style avatar for user NotMyRealUsername
    Is there such thing as 3D equilibrium? This is only 2D equilibrium.
    (2 votes)
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    • blobby green style avatar for user wolmot
      The phenomena explained in the video is concerned with the statics branch of engineering mechanics. Furthermore, only the 2D equlibrium concerned with statics, or bodies in equilibrium. When analyzing structures in a 3D space with a 3D coordinate system, equilibrium is maintained not only in the presumed x and y axes but also z axis too. In aerodynamics, there are even more axes to be concerned about: yaw, pitch and roll.
      (3 votes)
  • leafers ultimate style avatar for user L1LM4R1N3 :D
    Where do I get all the tools in the video;(
    (2 votes)
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  • starky ultimate style avatar for user Taction
    This does not make sense a bit can you tell me more about it
    (2 votes)
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  • duskpin ultimate style avatar for user Tessa Heywood
    Does distance matter in Equallibreium
    (1 vote)
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  • female robot grace style avatar for user Anna
    Isn't it a 3D equlibrium since it is equilibrium in 3D space and that everything that exists on this planet, even a sheet of paper is 3D?
    (1 vote)
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  • piceratops ultimate style avatar for user Aaron Travass
    What is the difference between Work done and Torque,when
    Work done=
    W=F x S
    (where F is the force, S is the displacement and W is the work done)

    Torque=F x D
    (where F is the force and D is the displacement)
    ?
    (1 vote)
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    • blobby green style avatar for user wolmot
      The key difference is in both words' usage in various applications. For example, you wouldn't say that, "1000 Joules of "Toque" was done on a crate as it was lifted a specified distance h" instead you'd say, "1000 Joules of WORK was done on a crate as it was lifted a specified distance h." Compare that with: 1000 J Torque (or moment - interchangeable terms) was subjected about an arbitrary point A on the given lever"... and so forth.

      So, in terms of equations, they're identical however in applications and terminology, not at all.
      (1 vote)
  • blobby green style avatar for user tandrusiak
    So if we were on another plaint would our whole system of measurement need to change because things might weigh differently there?
    (1 vote)
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Video transcript

I got this to balance by carefully measuring equal distances, and hanging equal weights at those distances. This balance is called equilibrium. Equilibrium is when the state of the system isn't changing. In this case, the 2D equilibrium case, the state of the system is the position of these objects, which still isn't changing, unless I throw a coin in to knock it out of equilibrium. In other types of equilibrium, the state of a system could be its temperature, or pressure, or something else entirely. But now, I'll focus on 2D equilibrium, the balanced state where the positions don't change. Some things balance in the middle, and these things tend to be symmetrical. Other things balance off to one side, always the heavier side. What if I want to move this cup a different distance away from the middle and still keep it all balanced? One way of doing this is moving the other cup to the new distance as well. Sure enough, it balances again. But there's another way of doing this. I could've left the right hand cup at the old position and just taken out some of its weight. This also balances. So we found two different ways of balancing the same thing. We can either change the weight or change the distance. In equilibrium, where we have forces F1 and F2 balancing each other at distances D1 and D2, the counterclockwise force times distance must equal the clockwise force times distance. Force times distance has a special name, torque, from the Latin word to twist. In 2D equilibrium, clockwise and counterclockwise torques are balanced. Before I calculate some torques, I need to check some of the masses. The mass of five coins is 13 grams. And the mass of the cup plus the string is also 13 grams. And since we're on Earth, this means that they both have the same weight, which I'll call W. Start it off with weights 2W one cup plus 5 coins hung on each side, distance I'll call D from the middle. And I got it balanced, and the torques 2 times W times D, are equal on both sides. And it balances. But when I moved the distance to 1/2D and kept the weight at 2W, five coins plus a cup, there were two ways that I could balance it. I could either move the other cup closer to 1/2D, or I could keep the other cup a D and just empty it of the five coins. So now its weight is only W. This leaves the counterclockwise torque, 1/2D times 2W, equal to the clockwise torque, D times W. But what if we move the left hand cup farther from the middle to 2D, and leave its weight at 2W. One way of balancing it is to move the right hand cup farther out as well. Or we can move the right hand cup back to D, and increase its weight to 4W. Let's check that this would make the torques work out. On the left hand side, we have 2D times 2W, which is 40W. And on the right hand side, we have D times 4W, which is also 40W. How many coins will we need in the cup for that? One cup is 1W, and so we need three more W, So that's 15 coins. So four W is equal to one cup plus three more W, which we get with 15 coins. I'll move the cup to a distance D from the middle and add a total of 15 coins, for a total weight of 4W. Sure enough, it balances, because in equilibrium, the counterclockwise torque has to equal the clockwise torque.