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Lesson 10: Chromatic scales and the half step

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  • primosaur ultimate style avatar for user Michael Stevenson
    Why don't piano's have a black key between every white key?
    (16 votes)
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  • eggleston green style avatar for user Jo
    If we have alto and tenor clefs to make it easier to read the music, how come at there are several notes with a lot of extra ledger lines? Thanks!
    (3 votes)
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    • aqualine sapling style avatar for user Lizzy
      Sometimes composers write it like that, or with the alto and tenor clefs.
      And plus, if you look closer those notes are made for piccolo, and flute( if i read correctly), and for piccolo and flute, usually they don't read in tenor or alto clefs. they read only in the treble clef.
      Hope that helps. Take care:)
      (2 votes)
  • hopper jumping style avatar for user Clark H.
    Why are the letters of the piano are ABCDEFG?
    (3 votes)
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  • blobby green style avatar for user Alexia Tang
    Where can I find those 'future lessons' discussing intervals?
    (4 votes)
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  • blobby green style avatar for user Raghav Sharma
    How can we practice sight reading? Please recommend a few pieces or songs! Thank you.
    (3 votes)
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  • starky seedling style avatar for user Ishita
    Now I'm confused, where are the future lessons on intervals?
    (2 votes)
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  • blobby green style avatar for user 😊
    so both flats and sharps are only the black keys ? , also how do i know which is which ?
    (1 vote)
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  • blobby green style avatar for user tomprice
    Why could a page or sheet of music be displayed and have student place notes as they are required , or perhaps create a simple song or tune, have note placed on line and student answer the note online or in a space f.a.c.e or e.g.b.d.f or whole actave.
    (1 vote)
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  • leafers seed style avatar for user dilsar2170
    why is there only keys to G and not any of the others or all 27 alphbates
    (1 vote)
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  • blobby green style avatar for user Ц
    i don't really get it...why I should use the accidental to low the 4th note in fis moll...
    (1 vote)
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Video transcript

- [Instructor] We have learned that there are seven names to all the notes, ABCDEFG. We can now add to that list of seven all the notes with sharps and flats. So an A, then there could be an A sharp, B, B sharp, C, C sharp, D, D sharp, and so forth. The same with flats. A, A flat, G, G flat, F, F flat, and so forth. Let's go back to our piano keyboard. From the treble clef middle C, let's look at the octave above, the C on the third space. There are 12 note from the middle C to the third space C. These notes make up the chromatic scale. (plays chromatic scale on piano) Remember that between E and F and between B and C there isn't a black key. Using sharps, here are all of the names of the notes of the chromaic scale. C, C sharp, D, D sharp, E, F, F sharp, G, G sharp, A, A sharp, B, C. The distance between each of these notes is called a half step or the interval of a semitone, also called a minor second. An interval is the distance between two musical pitches. We already know one interval, an octave, and in future lessons, we will discuss many intervals, but for now let's focus on the interval of a half step. This is a fundamental building block of all musical intervals. A chromatic scale is made up of 12 half steps. Now let's look a the chromatic scale from the third space C in the treble clef descending using flats. C, B, B flat, A, A flat, G, G flat, F, E, E flat, D, D flat, C. All half steps. Towards the end of Rimsky-Korsakov's Scheherazade in the flute part, he writes a chromatic scale, but he uses a combination of sharps, flats, and naturals to make this scale, all half steps, a chromatic scale. (dramatic orchestral music)