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Fractions on a number line

Learn to graph and locate fractions on a number line. Created by Sal Khan.

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  • blobby green style avatar for user Mayling Rea
    can someone please help me out and tell me about fractions
    (13 votes)
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  • blobby green style avatar for user Ilda Mae Igmen
    What happens if the numerator is at 0? like, 0/6? How do you put it in the number line?
    (14 votes)
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  • aqualine sapling style avatar for user afuhrman5278
    please help me with fractions like this: 10/5
    (5 votes)
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    • winston default style avatar for user Nuclear Studios
      Yes i can.
      so now as you say 10/5
      it is an improper fraction AS THE NUMERATOR (10) is GREATER THAN THE DENOMINATOR (5). it means this fraction is greater then 1, now if we divide 10 by 5 we get 2 as quotient and no remainder, which means 10/5 is 2. now if u wanna put these fractions on the number line. u need to put the number from 0 to 3 on the number line (only for this fraction) and as the denominator is 5, the distance between 2 numbers, for eg. 0 and 1 must have 5 parts, so we need to make 3 whole numbers on number line with 5 parts between all the numbers. so now we have 3*5 = 15 parts total, as we have numerator 10 we need to mark first 10 parts, and then u get the answer, which is 2 or 10/5

      I hope it helps

      Nuclear Studios
      (17 votes)
  • leaf green style avatar for user ricky he
    how do you mark oversized fractions on a number line like 15/5
    (1 vote)
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    • piceratops ultimate style avatar for user D S
      Since we're working with fifths - 1/5 or one fifth part of one whole- (5/5 would be a whole or 1) we can write out a number line, say, up to 3 with each number being a whole. Like this < 0 - - - - 1 - - - - 2 - - - - 3 >. Then we can cut up each space between each whole into five equal parts. Each part is 1/5 of each one whole. If we count up the fifths, up to fifteen fifths or 15/5, we get up to 3 on the line. This makes sense if you think about fifteen fifths, or 15/5 being 15 divided by 5, which is of course 3. Or as having 15 slices of pie. If 5 slices make one pie, then 15 slices is enough to put together 3 whole pies.
      (19 votes)
  • mr pants green style avatar for user dsolis13
    Relax dude its just math dude
    (5 votes)
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  • leafers seedling style avatar for user JJ
    please help me with
    these fractions!
    (4 votes)
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  • aqualine sapling style avatar for user breana.morgan
    is like 1/2 is one half and 1 whole is a numeder over its self like 9/9
    (3 votes)
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    • hopper cool style avatar for user Philip
      A fraction is basically a division problem. And any number (except 0) over itself will equal 1.
      For any fraction, the value in the numerator is the "initial amount", and the value in the denominator is how many equal parts it will be divided into. So for the 9/9, it means you have nine pieces, and they are divided into 9 equal parts (each part will get 1).
      (3 votes)
  • blobby green style avatar for user sanggavi3312
    is 1/2 the same as 100/200
    (4 votes)
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  • blobby green style avatar for user elaina.brockett745
    can it be a big number
    (3 votes)
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  • mr pants teal style avatar for user Madison Florczyk
    I do u dived a fraction evenly. sorry for my speeling!
    (3 votes)
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Video transcript

We've already seen that if we take a whole, and in this example, the whole is this entire green circle. And if we were to split it into 5 equal sections-- 1, 2, 3, 4, 5. So we've split it into 5 equal sections-- and if we were to select 1 of those 5 equal sections. So let's say we select this section right over here, that we have selected 1/5 of the whole, 1 out of the 5 equal sections. We could do the exact same thing on a number line. Everything we've been doing so far has to deal with shapes, but we could do the exact same idea on a number line. So let me draw a number line here. So let me draw it pretty big so we get a sense of things. So it will go all the way to there. And let's say that this is 0, this is 1, and this is 2. And of course, we could keep going if we had more space to 3, 4, and on and on and on. And what I want to do, instead of taking a circle and dividing it into 5 equal sections, I want to take the section of our number line between 0 and 1 and divide it into 5 equal sections. So let me see if I can do this. So 1, 2, 3, 4, 5. That looks pretty good. I'm drawing it as exact as I can with my hand. But let's just assume these are 5 equal sections. So what would you think would be a good label for this number right over here? Well, it's the exact same idea. Between 0 and 1, I've traveled 1 out of the 5 equal sections towards 1. And actually, let me make it a little bit neater than that. We could make the equal sections look a little bit better. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5. And what we're thinking about is this. What should we call this number here? This number is clearly between 0 and 1. It's clearly closer to 0. And we've gone 1 out of the 5 equal sections towards 1. Well, it makes complete sense that, look, we had 5 equal sections here. And we've traveled 1 of them towards 1. So we should call this number right over here 1/5. So when we're talking about a fraction, 1/5, it's not just talking about, hey, what part of a pizza pie have I eaten or something like that. This is actually a number. This is a number. And we can actually plot it on the number line. Now you might say, OK, well, that's fair about 1/5. But what about all these other slashes? What numbers would we call that? Well, we can make the exact same idea. If up here, instead of shading in 1 out of the 5 equal sections, if I shaded in 2 of the 5 equal sections, then I wouldn't say this is 1/5 any more. I would say that this 2/5. And so if I go 2 of the equal sections towards 1, then I should call this number right over here 2/5. And I could keep going. This right over here should be 3, 3/5. This right over here, I've gone 1, 2, 3, 4 out of the 5 sections towards 1. So I could call this 4/5. And I could keep going. I could call this right over here-- I've traveled 5 out of the 5 equal sections towards 5, so I could call this right over here 5. Let me do it in that red color. I could call this right over here 5/5. You might say, wait, but 5/5, we've gotten to 1. And that's exactly right. If I were to shade in 5 things over here-- let me do that little bit cleaner. That's not the color I want to use. If I were to shade in 5 things over here, we've already seen that shading in 5 things-- let me make this a little bit neater-- if this is now 5 over 5 or 5/5, we've already seen that this is a whole. And over here, if we've traveled 5/5 of the way towards 1, we've gotten to the whole 1. 5/5 is the exact same thing as 1. It is equal to a whole.