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Writing decimals and fractions greater than 1 shown on grids

Sal writes decimal numbers and fractions greater than 1 shown on grids. Decimals are limited to tenths and hundredths.

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  • starky seed style avatar for user 1700546
    i dont understand how it works im doing what your sayiong on my courses but it says wrong
    (24 votes)
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  • blobby green style avatar for user 27joseph.la
    i do not understand either (:.
    (13 votes)
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  • marcimus pink style avatar for user adkins280054
    when do you know when you have 100 as your the bottom as a example 12/100 or 12/10 how do know which is which?
    (12 votes)
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  • duskpin sapling style avatar for user Montes, Perla
    i do really understand this how can i understand it more im stuck
    (8 votes)
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  • starky sapling style avatar for user Anneliese
    don't understand how to do fractions and decimals with whole numbers and tenths like 19 tenths and 1 whole 🤷‍♀️😢😢😢😢😢😢😢😢😢😢😢😢🤷‍♀️
    (8 votes)
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  • winston baby style avatar for user RFrazee22
    Decimals are like counting down like 1,10,100 just in reverse it is the same thing. Here is some good edvice
    (8 votes)
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  • mr pink red style avatar for user Gurjot
    Would it still be correct if I did 2 7.4/10 for the mixed fraction or do I have to do 2 74/100
    (6 votes)
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  • blobby green style avatar for user m.isericordiaeinsta
    i saw a vid on youtube that said that, 92/1000 is 0.092. nut how if the first zero is in the ones place, and the second zero is in the tenths place, and the 9 is in the hundreths place, and the 2 is in the thousandths place. how does 9/100 and 2/1000 equal 92/1000. i thave it wrong but i don't understand.
    (6 votes)
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    • stelly blue style avatar for user Kim Seidel
      You need to understand the decimal place values.
      If you have 0.123, then you have 1/10+2/100+3/1000. If you were to add these fractions by using a common denominator, you would have: 100/1000 + 20/1000 + 3/1000 = 123/1000

      If you are given 92/1000, then you know your answer needs 3 decimal places since the denominator is 1000. So, what digit goes where.
      92/1000 = 90/1000+2/1000 = 9/100 + 2/1000
      The 90/1000 reduces to 9/100. So the 9 goes in the hundredths place (2nd decimal place) and the 2 goes in the 3rd decimal digit. Since, not digit was specified for the tenths place, it gets a 0 as a place holder.

      Hope this helps.
      (2 votes)
  • blobby green style avatar for user Lerelsadouya
    i am only in year three learning in year four
    (5 votes)
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  • starky tree style avatar for user PranavM
    Awesome video! Really helped!
    (4 votes)
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Video transcript

- [Instructor] We're told each big square below represents one whole. Express the shaded area as both a mixed number and a decimal. So pause this video and see if you can do that. What would this be as a mixed number, and then what would it be as a decimal? All right, now let's do it together. So let's first start with the mixed number. So we see that we have one whole here, the whole thing is filled out, so this is going to be one whole, and then over here, we have part of this second whole filled out, and it looks like we're dividing this whole into 10 equal sections, and then two of those are filled out. So as a mixed number, we have one and then you have two of the 10ths filled out. So this is gonna be 1 2/10, and we're done. You can see here, this is split into 10ths, and we filled in two of them. Now, what about as a decimal? Well, we could just express 1 2/10 as a decimal. We could say, hey, that's going to be one, and then we get to the 10th place, and then how many 10ths do we have? We have two of them. So that's going to be 1.2. Let's do another example. So here, this is a little bit more involved. They say, once again, each big square below represents one whole. And once again, they want us to express the shaded area as both a fraction and a decimal. So pause this video and have a go at this. All right, so let's start with the fraction again. So we have one whole, two wholes, and then partially shaded in this third whole, so if I'm gonna express this as a fraction, really it's going to be a mixed number, I would say that this over here, this is two wholes. Now, this third whole is only partially filled in, and we can see that it has been divided into 100ths, you can see it's a 10 by 10 grid, so each of these squares represent 100th of a whole, and how many of these 100ths are filled in? Well, let's see, you have 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, and then you have 71, two, three, four. We can see that 74 of the 100ths are filled in. So as a mixed number, this whole thing would represent 2 74/100. Now, if we wanna write it as a decimal, we would have two wholes, and then we could go to the 10ths place. You could just write two and 74 100ths like that, if you're pretty familiar with it. You could also think about it in terms of how many 10ths and how many 100ths did you have. We have one, two, three, four, five, six, seven 10ths, and then we have four more 100ths beyond that, so you could think of it as 74 100ths or 7/10 and 400ths, but either way, we are done.