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Factoring quadratics: negative common factor + grouping

Sal factors -12f^2-38f+22 as -2(2f-1)(3f+11). Created by Sal Khan and Monterey Institute for Technology and Education.

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  • blobby green style avatar for user paul.gunbound
    I'm confused because the way I did gave me (3x + 11)(-4x + 2). I'm going to lose points in my exams doing it in my way ? I'm worried about that.
    (26 votes)
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    • blobby green style avatar for user Manzir Zaman
      The way U did it its OK.

      Coz the main reason for factoring is to find out the values of the variable 'x'.

      In this case u have 2 values

      x=-11/3 and x=2/4 or 1/2.


      let me break it down though...


      -12x2-38x+22

      =-12x2+6x-44x+22

      =-6x(2x-1)-22(2x-1)

      =(2x-1)(-6x-22)

      -2(2x-1)(3x+11)

      thats the same thing as your answer...

      multiply that -2 with (2x-1)


      then U will get

      (-4x+2)(3x+11)

      : )
      (63 votes)
  • piceratops ultimate style avatar for user Rutger S
    This isn't in the video, but I don't know where else to ask it:
    While doing the exercise, I got -7x²-10x-3, and I simplified it like

    -7x² - 10x - 3
    -7x² (-7x - 3x) - 3
    (-7x² -7x) (-3x-3)
    -7x(x) -3(x)
    x(-7x-3)

    According to the test, this was wrong. Can someone explain why?
    (9 votes)
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  • blobby green style avatar for user gmomrocks
    What if you end up with a binomial that are not the same, like at ? What do you do then?
    (13 votes)
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  • piceratops seedling style avatar for user Jake Peters
    is there any other way to solve the problem besides writing it out?
    (3 votes)
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  • blobby green style avatar for user harry song
    i got -2(-3x-11)(2x-1) is that correct?
    (4 votes)
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    • hopper cool style avatar for user Chuck Towle
      Close, you made two small errors.
      The variable was an f and you changed it to a x. No big deal, but you the letter in the answer shoudl still be f.
      and second, your (-3x-11) shoudl be (+3f-11) the sign on the 3 should be positive.
      Check you work and see where you missed the sign.
      Good luck
      (6 votes)
  • blobby green style avatar for user hannahmmr186
    i have a question that is (x+2)^2 - (x+2) - 42 does this go to 4x^2 - 2x - 42? and if so what do i do then?
    (3 votes)
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    • blobby green style avatar for user Tina Balgemann
      You can substitute a plain x for (x+2) and factor first to make it easier, but then you have to replace it back. So it becomes x^2-x-42. Then facor that: (x-7)(x+6)then plug the (x+2) back in for the x.
      (x+2-7)(x+2+6)= (x-5)(x+8)ANSWER

      If you multiply (x+2)^2 first it equals x^2+4x+4 not 4x^2 so be careful and remember to foil. This method is more work, but it would be x^2+4x+4-x-2-42
      after simplifying it would be x^2+3x-40. Then factor to (x+8)(x-5) ANSWER
      (4 votes)
  • female robot ada style avatar for user liz fassinou
    This might be a weird question but how would you solve for what f is??
    (4 votes)
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  • piceratops ultimate style avatar for user Aidan C.
    Is there any way to do this a little faster? It takes a lot of time to do, and I have a time limit on all of my tests and quizzes.
    (3 votes)
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    • starky tree style avatar for user keefe
      Just practice a lot! Once you really understand it, (you still have to do each step) you can do the steps faster. From experience, I can say that after doing these for about a week or so, I've really gotten the hang of it, from doing about 20+ factoring polynomials a day! Hope this helps!
      (3 votes)
  • piceratops ultimate style avatar for user Sahiba
    At , Mr.Khan says to try a few numbers that add to 19 and multiply to -66. This works for small numbers, but what about if you have a really LARGE quadratic to factor? Then it would take a very long time to find the 2 numbers. I have been searching up methods, and the quickest one I found was the prime factorization method. However, this is still taking too long. My quadratic I am trying to factor is 84x^2+181x-90. Multiplying the 84 and -90 gets me to 7260, but it is taking me too long to figure out what 2 numbers multiply to that and add to 181. I am looking for a method I can use to factor these really fast because in my math counts competition I cant spend forever on one question.

    Thanks!
    (3 votes)
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  • duskpin seed style avatar for user Samantha Rittenberg
    Why does a times b have to be -66 and a + b have to be 19?
    (3 votes)
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Video transcript

We need to factor negative 12f squared minus 38f, plus 22. So a good place to start is just to see if, is there any common factor for all three of these terms? When we look at them, they're all even. And we don't like a negative number out here. So let's divide everything, or let's factor out a negative 2. So this expression right here is the same thing as negative 2 times-- what's negative 12f squared divided by negative 2? It's positive 6f squared. Negative 38 divided by negative 2 is positive 19, so it'll be positive 19f. And then 22 divided by negative 22-- oh, sorry, 22 divided by negative 2 is negative 11. So we've simplified it a bit. We have the 6f squared plus 19f, minus 11. We'll just focus on that part right now. And the best way to factor this thing, since we don't have a 1 here as the coefficient on the f squared, is to factor it by grouping. So we need to look for two numbers whose product is 6 times negative 11. So two numbers, so a times b, needs to be equal to 6 times negative 11, or negative 66. And a plus b needs to be equal to 19. So let's try a few numbers here. So let's see, 22, I'm just thinking of numbers that are roughly 19 apart, because they're going to be of different signs. So 22 and 3, I think will work. Right. If we take 22 times negative 3, that is negative 66, and 22 plus negative 3 is equal to 19. And the way I kind of got pretty close to this number is, well, you know, they're going to be of different signs, so the positive versions of them have to be about 19 apart, and that worked out. 22 and negative 3. So now we can rewrite this 19f right here as the sum of negative 3f and 22f. That's the same thing as 19f. I just kind of broke it apart. And, of course, we have the 6f squared and we have the minus 11 here. Now, you're probably saying, hey Sal, why did you put the 22 here and the negative 3 there? Why didn't you do it the other way around? Why didn't you put the 22 and then the negative 3 there? And my main motivation for doing it, I like to put the negative 3 on the same side with the 6 because they have the common factor of the 3. I like to put the 22 with the negative 11, they have the same common factor of 11. So that's why I decided to do it that way. So now let's do the grouping. And, of course, you can't forget this negative 2 that we have sitting out here the whole time. So let me put that negative 2 out there, but that'll just kind of hang out for awhile. But let's do some grouping. So let's group these first two. And then we're going to group this-- let me get a nice color here-- and then we're going to group this second two. Well, that's almost an identical color. Let me do it in this purple color. And then we can group that second two right there. So these first two, we could factor out a negative 3f, so it's negative 3f times-- 6f squared divided by negative 3f is negative 2f. And then negative 3f divided by negative 3f is just positive f. Actually, a better way to start, instead of factoring out a negative 3f, let's just factor out 3f, so we don't have a negative out here. We could do it either way. But if we just factor out a 3f, 6f squared divided by 3f is 2f. And then negative 3f divided by 3f is negative 1. So that's what that factors into. And then that second part, in that dark purple color, can factor out an 11. And if we factor that out, 22f divided by 11 is 2f, and negative 11 divided by 11 is negative 1. And, of course, once again, you have that negative 2 hanging out there. Now, inside the parentheses, we have two terms, both of which have 2f minus 1 as a factor. So we can factor that out. This whole thing is just an exercise in doing the reverse distributive property, if you will. So let's factor that out, so you have 2f minus 1, times this 3f, and then times that plus 11. Let me do that in the same shade of purple right over there. And you know, you can distribute it if you like. 2f minus 1 times 3f will give you this term, 2f f minus 1 times 11 will give you that term. And we can't forget that we still have that negative 2 hanging out outside. I want to change the colors on it. And we're done factoring it. Negative 12f squared minus 38f, plus 22 is negative 2 times 2f minus 1, times 3f plus 11.