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SAT

Unit 11: Lesson 3

Writing: Grammar

Writing: Subject-verb agreement — Example

Watch Sal work through a harder subject-verb agreement question from the SAT Writing and Language Test.

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  • piceratops seed style avatar for user jacksonshipp
    could you make a video with more examples on it? we are learning this right now and I'm having trouble with it...
    (25 votes)
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    • orange juice squid orange style avatar for user vikas
      On the Khan Academy Reading & Writing SAT section, there is a list of 5 question practices. It is called "Grammar and Effective Language Use." There is a section for Subject-Verb Agreement and you can use that to practice.
      (2 votes)
  • male robot donald style avatar for user June Lee
    But for the question, does "has rescued" work?
    (6 votes)
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  • male robot johnny style avatar for user Adam Chandler
    This was on one of the sat overview videos, however I was wondering if this is correct:
    When any one of these changes occur, it is the result of careful planners.
    (2 votes)
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  • piceratops tree style avatar for user Khaled Amer
    If "is rescuing" was a choice, will it be the correct one?
    (3 votes)
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    • leafers tree style avatar for user anannya mndl
      Acceptable, but not the best answer. It would be better to still use "rescues", as the action happens "every year". When an action occurs repeatedly, we normally use the simple present tense. We use the present continuous tense for use in situations, where an action is occurring for a period of time (not necessarily regularly, probably only one time) and is happening right now at the moment of speaking.
      (2 votes)
  • blobby green style avatar for user Daps
    Real quick question.

    If you are ever dealing with a subject verb agreement question, does the singular subject ALWAYS correlate with the plural verb. That's all I'm confused on: whether or not a singular subject matches with a plural verb or vice versa (plural subject goes with a singular verb). Appreciate it!
    (2 votes)
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  • blobby green style avatar for user hopeycx
    ....Given their importance and prominence...., the possessive pronoun their, followed by an and-phrase, when should we repeat the possessive pronoun, like their importance and their prominence?
    (1 vote)
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  • blobby green style avatar for user cgonfire1
    What form of the verb "is" would I use if I had a sentence like this?
    Arsenal, a popular football club in the English Premier League, is on the verge of signing a new player.
    Or
    Arsenal, a popular football club in the English Premier League, are on the verge of signing a new player.
    Thx to whoever answers this.
    (1 vote)
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  • blobby green style avatar for user radikasharif9
    'everyone' is a sigular subjecy?
    (1 vote)
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  • duskpin sapling style avatar for user Jocelyn
    Is it possible that maybe you guys could add all the parts of speech to this page? I would love to learn more.
    (0 votes)
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    • purple pi purple style avatar for user doctorfoxphd
      Have you looked at how many examples are included? Which ones have been left out that you still want to learn? Or do you mean that you want a list of parts of speech to be attached here? The topic here is SAT Reading and Writing Practice, so they show the kinds of grammar that will be tested, not all basic grammar facts. It might be easier to Google parts of speech.
      (2 votes)

Video transcript

- [Instructor] Borderlands Food Bank, an organization in Nogales, Arizona, rescue millions of pounds of slightly imperfect imported food every year and then they underlined the verb rescue and we see all of the choices here are have rescued, are rescuing, rescues. So they're all different forms of the verb rescue. So let's just think about it. Let's first think about, well, what is doing the rescuing? So we see the thing that's doing the rescuing is Borderlands Food Bank, Borderlands Food Bank which is an organization in Nogales, Arizona. Now, is Borderlands Food Bank one thing or many things? Is it singular or is it plural? Well, we're only talking about one organization. We're only talking about one food bank and so this right over here is singular. This is singular. It's not Borderlands Food Banks. Now, if you're not careful when you see this s here, your brain might say oh, I'm dealing with something plural but it's Borderlands Food Bank, not Borderlands Food banks. So we have a singular subject here and now what about the verb? Is this the verb that we would use for a singular subject? Would you say, would you say, let's say he, would you say he rescue, he rescue or would you say he rescues? He, let me rewrite this, he rescues, he rescues food, he rescue food or would you write he rescues food? Rescues food. Well, if you have a singular subject, the singular form of the verb rescue is rescues. So since we have a singular subject here, we wanna say Borderlands Food Bank, an organization in Nogales, Arizona, rescues millions of pounds of slightly imperfect imported food every year. Rescue, this right over here, that is the plural form of the verb. So you would say they rescue, they rescue food. If you have a plural subject, if you have a plural subject then you would go with the rescue. So this is the plural form but you have a singular subject so you don't want that, you want the singular form of the verb. Singular form of the verb. You want rescues. So you want rescues right here. So we already saw why we didn't want, why we definitely wanted to change it because it was the plural form and actually all of these are also plural forms but just in different tenses. If you say have, have rescued, have, you don't say he have done something. You would say he has done something. You'd say they have done something. So this is still a plural form and once again, you wouldn't say, you wouldn't say he are rescuing. You would say they are rescuing. So this also is a plural form. So the first three choices all have the plural form even though they're different tenses, both plural form even though the subject is singular. This right over here has the appropriate verb for a singular subject.