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SAT

Unit 11: Lesson 3

Writing: Grammar

Writing: Possessive determiners — Example 2

Watch Sal work through a harder possessive determiners question from the SAT Writing and Language Test.​.

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  • mr pink red style avatar for user meetam49
    What's difference between yours and your?
    (0 votes)
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  • spunky sam blue style avatar for user Debbie Clifton
    How do you know when to write it's versus its
    (2 votes)
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  • leaf green style avatar for user 20dursac
    How do you know when to use ‘ or ‘s on the end of a name
    (4 votes)
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  • male robot hal style avatar for user Louisa Aguirre
    what's the difference between 'your' and "you're"?
    (1 vote)
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    • blobby green style avatar for user Mrunal  Chavan
      "Your" means something which belongs to "you'' and "You're" means "You Are". It describes the adjective "about you".OR.it describes about the qualities which you have.
      For example....
      1.Your:-
      Is this your pen?
      OR
      This is your opportunity.
      2.You're:-
      You're amazing.i.e.You are amazing.
      This is the difference.
      (11 votes)
  • blobby green style avatar for user Rushi Yalamanchili
    can someone please explain when to use it vs it's? i have looked at numerous sources, but am still confused?
    (3 votes)
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    • piceratops ultimate style avatar for user adam.ghatta
      The contraction "it's" is used in place of "it is".
      An example of this is when you are describing something, and instead of saying "it is" something, you can shorten it to "it's".

      Example:
      What's that?
      It's Mine!

      Its (no apostrophe) on the other hand is used when describing what something belongs to, but does not stand for anything like a contraction does.

      Example:
      The dog hurt its nose.
      The turtle went in its shell.

      Lastly, "it" is just used as a replacement for what you are talking about.

      "Do you have the car?"
      "Yes, I have it."
      (7 votes)
  • duskpin sapling style avatar for user caroline
    I understand its vs. it's but what about for names? Like is it determined on the context? For example, David's really awesome. But couldn't you use David's for something that he owns too? Like David's new bunny. Does that make any sense?
    (3 votes)
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  • blobby green style avatar for user Andre421
    It depends on whether the sentence uses restrictive or non- restrictive clause.
    In case of restrictive clause, you don't.
    E.g. I admire students who always complete their homework.
    (This means that I admire those students who complete their work)

    In case of non-restrictive clause, you do.
    E.g. I admire students, who always complete their homework.
    ( Here, 'always complete their homework' is an additional information. The sentence implies that I admire all students in general and that I assume that all of them do their homework.) This means that you also use comma for an off-topic (or a parenthetical) element. E.g- My teacher, who never liked me, invited me over for dinner. (Here, the teacher inviting me over is the main focus and 'who never liked me' was an off topic element, hence, separated by commas on both sides)
    I hope this helped!
    (3 votes)
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  • leafers ultimate style avatar for user Dhruv Patel
    what about they're would that be related to their and there?
    (2 votes)
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  • blobby green style avatar for user zalak2004
    How many of this type of question are there in the SAT?
    (1 vote)
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    • piceratops ultimate style avatar for user Hecretary Bird
      Possessives aren't one of the most common skills on the SAT Writing section, but they aren't the least common either. I'd estimate that you'd see about 2-3 per SAT test. Still definitely frequent enough to put some time into if you realize you might have a weakness here.
      (1 vote)
  • leafers sapling style avatar for user Surya Rajan
    In the sentence in the video, there is a comma before the word,
    "because". In which types of sentences are we allowed to do this? I originally thought that there can't be a comma before a subordinating conjunction that comes after an independent clause.
    (1 vote)
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Video transcript

- [Instructor] Get up from that chair, because doctors say that walking for even two minutes every hour can have a significant impact on you're health. All right, so we've underlined you're. And this is strange, because you apostrophe R-E, this is a contraction for you are. And so we should just be able to replace it with you are and see if it makes sense. Because doctors say that even walking for two minutes every hour can have a significant impact on you are health. Well, that clearly doesn't make any sense. I am not health. So let's not, let's rule out keeping it the way it is. And the intention here was to have your, the second person possessive, your health. Whose health? Your health. So this is something that you have, you have your health. So this is what was intended. And they sound the same, but they are spelled differently. We want Y-O-U-R. Yours health, that doesn't even sound right. Or a significant impact on their health. Well, their health doesn't make sense because they're telling, the sentence is speaking to the second person. It's saying get up from that chair. It's speaking directly to a person. So if I'm speaking directly to a person, I would say, "Hey, you." I wouldn't say, "Hey, them" or their health. So I would rule out these two, as well. So very important to realize, this you're versus your. This is something, this is one of the most common grammar mistakes. I would say your versus you're is up there with their versus there and its versus it's. And all of these cases, these are possessive pronouns right over here, and these are other things. This one over here and this one over here, these are contractions. And there, this is in reference to something. This is kind of saying a location, here or there. Or there are so many things, while this is a possessive. So these are good ones to know. I think even the best of folks have made this mistake when they're typing an email really fast. And so it's definitely a good think to keep a close eye on.