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SAT

Unit 11: Lesson 3

Writing: Grammar

Verb tense and mood | Quick guide

What are verb tense and mood?

What's on the test?

Tips and strategies

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  • duskpin sapling style avatar for user Amulya M
    I found this question in the practice section for this topic on Khan Academy:

    The documentary Rize explores the origins and evolution of Krumping and Clowning, two dance forms that would have emerged from South Los Angeles.

    We are asked to substitute for the words in bold to make the sentence grammatically correct. The answer given is "emerged".

    While I understand why this is correct, I wondered if we could use "have emerged" (though it was not in the options provided).

    Another place where I felt confused:
    "Ever since Alice discovered the secret elevator, she is using it to travel between the first and second floors and to avoid crowds in the hallway."
    The answer given is "has been using". Is "used" also correct here? (Again, I understand why the given answer is right but this wasn't in the options and I wanted to know if it was correct.)

    In which situations do we use have/has + verb and have/has + been + verb?
    (3 votes)
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    • piceratops ultimate style avatar for user Hecretary Bird
      The Khan Academy grammar course and the people that answer questions there may be able to provide a little more insight.
      "have + verb" is a verb form we call the perfect tense. You use it to talk about things that may have started happening in the past but still have an impact in the present. In the question, "have emerged" would mean that Krumping and Clowning are still around today. Just plain "emerged" wouldn't give you information about them today.
      "has been + verb" is called the perfect continuous. This combines the ideas of the perfect tense, and the continuous (AKA progressive) one (verbs that end in "-ing" and mean that an action is currently ongoing). It signifies that the action started in the past, but is continuing on in the present. In the second example, "has been using" means that Alice started using it a while ago, and is still using it when the sentence takes place. "Used" would also make grammatical sense there, but it would slightly change the meaning of the sentence, and you would no longer know if Alice was using the elevator in the present or not.
      (14 votes)
  • blobby green style avatar for user lloyd007008
    i dont rly understand:(
    (3 votes)
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  • blobby green style avatar for user Nyeche Rebecca
    I thought the preferable answer there would have been occurs because IS is singular and occurs is also singular but occur is plural
    (2 votes)
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    • piceratops ultimate style avatar for user Hecretary Bird
      When you're making sure that nouns and verbs are in agreement, you have to make sure to correctly identify the noun that the verb is talking about. Here, the verb "occur" would be referring to the two species of flowering plants. Because we have a plural noun, we need the plural form which is "occur". "Is" is singular here because it refers to Antarctic Pearlwort, which is a singular noun.
      (5 votes)
  • blobby green style avatar for user 2022teebreneyin
    How do you know when to use the Simple, Perfect, Progressive, and Perfect-progressive tenses?
    (2 votes)
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    • blobby blue style avatar for user Ken McAvoy
      Simple is like well simple. Perfect is talking about something you've completed. Progressive is something that's still happening. Perfect-progressive is a bit tricky: it's a combination of completion and something that is still ongoing. But reading the surrounding text will help you spot patterns. Sometimes the passage will use the same tense.
      (3 votes)
  • blobby green style avatar for user Gensei
    Is "occur" not a plural verb?
    (3 votes)
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  • aqualine ultimate style avatar for user IncognitoMode
    is progressive tense and stuff like that gonna be on the shsat?
    (1 vote)
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    • piceratops ultimate style avatar for user Hecretary Bird
      The SAT will never go out and ask "What is the name for the tense of this verb" or anything like that, but it will test to see if you can use the progressive by asking you to choose the verb with the tense that matches up most with the sentence and things like that. You'll have to know what a verb in the progressive tense does, but not really anything past that.
      (5 votes)
  • blobby green style avatar for user faizanbadin
    Shouldn't it be "if she has the time "instead of had
    (1 vote)
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    • female robot amelia style avatar for user Johanna
      Nope, this sentence’s verbs are written correctly. When the sentence’s main clause (without the “if”) uses the word “would” but not “would have”, the if clause will use the simple past verb tense. That’s why it needs to be “had the time” instead of “has the time”: to match the rest of the sentence. This is called the second conditional.

      Using “has the time” would either make the sentence real conditional (If she has the time, she runs every day.) or first conditional: (If she has the time, she will run every day.)

      It’s pretty complicated, but that sentence uses the conditional correctly. I hope this helps a bit.
      (4 votes)
  • piceratops seed style avatar for user Charles Delhomme
    I don't have any questions
    (0 votes)
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