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SAT

Unit 11: Lesson 3

Writing: Grammar

Strong support | Quick guide

What's on the test?

Tips and strategies

Your turn!

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  • blobby green style avatar for user Henry Infante
    If a word is displayed in the sentence you don't know the definition to then how would i go about this?
    (20 votes)
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    • purple pi pink style avatar for user owokids
      In this scenario, a tip would be to figure out the meaning by analyzing the context. A word is not put in just to be put in, it usually correlates with the reading. So by analyzing the sentences around the word you'll be able to get an idea of what this word means.
      (41 votes)
  • leaf blue style avatar for user isaac.awad2020
    i did every thing wrong not just 1s 3 times like i did the firs thing it did not work then i did the other and it did not work then i did the third and it did not work i am so so sad i don't understand like when i watch the relay good teacher in the video do it i understand but when i do it every thing is wrong. help =[
    (8 votes)
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    • male robot donald style avatar for user azahid1
      Don't give up; keep trying!

      Now, look at the paragraph as a whole and how the sentence plays a role. First, the paragraph starts out saying, "[w]e tend to think...". Usually, introductions such as "we tend to think", "It is often assumed", and "Most people think" first introduce a thought, then rebutes it. An example of this can be something like "We tend to think of food being freely available, but many people around the world suffer from hunger". First, I introduced a common misconception then rebutted it.

      So the first sentence introduces a claim that is supposed to be rebutted. We can read the last sentence and see that it compares a giant squid to a tiny slug.

      Notice that the second sentence has a similie: it makes a comparison using like or as (in this case it uses as). Since we're using this similie to disprove a common misconception, we want to make it clear that it's wrong. Remember from the third sentence we want to make a comparison with size. A comparsion between fish and birds isn't that extreme and won't jump out at the user. This is the same for the other ones, except for C and D. Humans compared to other animals (a human isn't that much bigger than a dog compared to a mouse vs. elephant) doesn't jump out nearly as much as mice compared to elephants. When you read the sentence, you might first picture a mouse then imagine an elephant. What a great difference that is!

      Since you want to make a great distinction to rebutt the claim, this is the best option.
      (13 votes)
  • blobby green style avatar for user S. M. Tafrid Islam
    Hello. I thought the answer would be C because I felt it expressed Dali's collaboration with other artists. May I know, why this failed to be the answer?
    (3 votes)
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    • piceratops ultimate style avatar for user Hecretary Bird
      The two main claims of the last sentence that we're looking to appear in the answer choices are that Dali used other mediums besides paint, and that he enjoyed collaborating with others. C) actually doesn't support either of those. It talks about his flair and style, but not his diverse art style or anything like that. It talks about how he was well-remembered, but not about him collaborating with other artists. Finally, there's that word "but", which you'd never want to see in something that supports a claim in the previous sentence.
      Instead, A) is a better answer. It talks about a different medium, a film, and about Dali's collaboration with Alfred Hitchcock.
      (5 votes)
  • blobby green style avatar for user ivyrobert2005
    Hey! What do you suggest I do: I am terrible at math but good at English…trying to aim a 1500
    (2 votes)
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    • female robot amelia style avatar for user Johanna
      If you haven’t already, I suggest taking a practice test to see how much you need to improve. Then if you have enough time you might want to re-teach yourself SAT math so you know both the content and the tricks. Don’t neglect English, though; sometimes it can be easier to improve something you already find a strength! :)
      (2 votes)
  • blobby green style avatar for user Elias Roy
    Hey! What do you suggest I do: I am terrible at math but good at English…trying to aim a 1500
    (1 vote)
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  • blobby green style avatar for user sj05003
    If you haven’t already, I suggest taking a practice test to see how much you need to improve.
    (1 vote)
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  • duskpin seed style avatar for user Romi, Delva
    In this scenario, a tip would be to figure out the meaning by analyzing the context
    (1 vote)
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  • blobby green style avatar for user Oluwateniola Ayeni
    I find this aspect very confusing...where can i get help
    (1 vote)
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  • blobby green style avatar for user Natnael
    you gave me a hope
    (1 vote)
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  • blobby green style avatar for user Imran Uddin
    What is difference between SAT and LCAT (LUMS Common Admission Test)? I mean,to what extent do they differ?
    (0 votes)
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