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SAT

Unit 11: Lesson 3

Writing: Grammar

Concision | Quick guide

What is concision?

What's on the test?

Tips and strategies

Your turn!

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  • blobby green style avatar for user NAKAYAH JONES
    I did so good i get them all right
    (23 votes)
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  • male robot donald style avatar for user Vadaga Rishi
    If the question asked is:
    "The dog quickly ran speedily into the house."
    Then why can't the answer be: "The dog ran into the house,"
    rather than "The dog ran speedily into the house." or "The dog quickly ran into the house."
    Are the adverbs really necessary in the sentence to be concise?
    (4 votes)
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    • piceratops ultimate style avatar for user adam.ghatta
      No, the adverbs do not make the sentence any more concise, but they are part of the sentence, leaving them out could result in some information lost. I think if this was on a test, then the answer could be ran into the house, because they are just testing your ability to concisely sum up information by combining sentences. I think this example is too objective to be on a test, though.
      (20 votes)
  • blobby green style avatar for user Imran Uddin
    What is difference between SAT and LCAT (LUMS Common Admission Test)? I mean,to what extent do they differ?
    (2 votes)
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  • duskpin sapling style avatar for user Amulya M
    So maybe I'm being a bit nitpicky, but in the example under tips and strategies: "After having waited for six weeks of time, Jacintha received her passport in the mail.", for which the answer given is: "After six weeks, Jacintha received her passport in the mail.", why is the following sentence not correct? "After waiting for six weeks, Jacintha received her passport in the mail."

    The question shows us an action of waiting, and though the answer implicitly states the same, it doesn't stress on the fact that she 'waited'. Doesn't that essentially change the sentence?

    Also, I may be wrong, aren't the sentences in the question and answer in different tenses? Does that affect the "correctness of the sentence"?
    (1 vote)
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    • female robot amelia style avatar for user Johanna
      "After waiting for six weeks" is also grammatically correct, but it's not as short/concise as "after six weeks". If they were both multiple choice options, I don't know which the College Board would prefer, as your suggestion indeed retains the emphasized "waiting", but it's also longer.

      I think this "shorter is usually better" idea is most applicable when you've already narrowed down the choices a bit. If the question had two grammatically incorrect answer choices, it'd be better to choose the shorter one of the remaining two.

      Also, both sentences are in the same tense. You determine tense based off the verb ("received" in both sentences), not the add-ons. If you're talking about "after waiting for six weeks", that phrase (which in neither case includes the sentence's main verb) is in a different tense from "after having waited".
      (2 votes)
  • blobby green style avatar for user Sean Lambert-Knight
    lol was confused forgot yankee was a baseball team shouldnt it be Yankees with an "s'' tho?
    (0 votes)
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    • piceratops ultimate style avatar for user Hecretary Bird
      If you're referring to the whole team, it would be the Yankees. Since "Yankees" is plural, it's become common practice to refer to one member of the Yankees as a Yankee (although this isn't standard across all sports teams or anything, just a convention that somehow came about). "Yankee" is better to use as an adjective.
      (0 votes)