If you're seeing this message, it means we're having trouble loading external resources on our website.

If you're behind a web filter, please make sure that the domains *.kastatic.org and *.kasandbox.org are unblocked.

Main content

Course: LSAT (DEPRECATED) > Unit 1

Lesson 5: Analytical Reasoning – Worked examples

Mixed setup | New info–must be true 1 | Worked example

Watch a demonstration of one way to approach a "New info: must be true" question on an mixed setup from the Analytical Reasoning section of the LSAT.

Want to join the conversation?

  • piceratops ultimate style avatar for user Mona Ghassemi
    I've also noticed that the presenter does not adequately use time-saving strategies in any of the LG videos here. A quick glance at the options would lead us to check the option with L first, since it is an unrestricted entity and we know that H is before F. This leaves only G and H to go in the two slots in the first segment.
    (7 votes)
    Default Khan Academy avatar avatar for user
  • blobby green style avatar for user johnwillette3
    How could you not arrive to A?

    If H must come before both F and MK, and L is unrestricted, both scenarios can be fulfilled with : 1: G,H; 2: F; 3: M,K; 4: L... and 1: G,H; 2: F; 3: L; 4: M,K.

    This would fulfill all requirements, given the new rule that G must be interviewed with H.
    (3 votes)
    Default Khan Academy avatar avatar for user
    • blobby green style avatar for user brittany96carter
      Well, those scenarios do not FORCE G to be in segment 1. L or G could still be interchanged with no restrictions.

      But if you put L in position 2 in the first scenario, F has to go in position 4 and that leaves G and H for position 1.

      L FORCES F to go in position 3 in the second scenario leaving G and H for first.

      The wording of the questions is what gets me, too, but it wants to know what would force G to be with H.
      (3 votes)
  • blobby green style avatar for user Randall Arana
    If F in position 2. G can go in position 3 or 4.

    If L is in position 2. It forces F to go in position 3 or 4. Also forcing G & H to be together. L in position two has a stronger force for G & H.

    The questions was asking which one forces G & H together.
    (2 votes)
    Default Khan Academy avatar avatar for user

Video transcript

- [Instructor] Before you watch this video, make sure to watch the overview video for the setup where we went through the introduction and noted the rules and made an initial diagram that you're gonna see me using here. The question asks Greer must be interviewed in the same segment as Hernandez if which one of the following is true? Basically, this question is asking us, what condition would force Greer and Hernandez to be paired up in the same segment? The answer, if it's true, would lead to Greer and Hernandez being interviewed in the same segment. And the four wrong choices wouldn't necessarily lead to Greer and Hernandez being interviewed together. So let's evaluate the choices and use our initial setup to help guide us. A, Fallon is interviewed in the second segment. We can use scenario one to see that this doesn't force Greer and Hernandez to be together. In scenario one, Fallon could be interviewed in the second segment and then we could put Greer alone in segment four, while Hernandez and Lewis are together in segment one. B, Greer is interviewed in the first segment. This doesn't force Greer and Hernandez to be together. Take a look at scenario two. If Greer is interviewed in the first segment, it could be alongside Lewis. Then Hernandez would be second and Fallon would be third. There's no problem here. So this isn't our answer because Greer and Hernandez aren't interviewed together. C, Kim is interviewed in the third segment. This is wrong for the same reason that choice A was wrong. In scenario one, Kim already is interviewed in the third segment and Greer could be alone in segment four. So this condition isn't sufficient for us to deduce that Greer and Hernandez are together. D, Lewis is interviewed in the second segment. Let's test this choice out. In scenario two, if Lewis is in segment two, that would place Fallon alone in segment three. So, Greer and Hernandez would be the two that have to be interviewed in segment one. Okay. And in scenario one, if Lewis were in the second segment, that would mean that Hernandez has to be in segment one in order to be earlier than Fallon, who would have to be in segment four. That would, again, force Greer into segment one alongside Hernandez. That means that we have our answer. If Lewis is interviewed in a second segment, it forces Greer and Hernandez to be together and that's the result that we were looking for. Let's take a quick peek at E. It tells us that Munson is interviewed in the fourth segment. This doesn't work for us because Munson is interviewed in the fourth segment in scenario two and it doesn't result in Greer and Hernandez being paired. So, for this question, D is our answer.