If you're seeing this message, it means we're having trouble loading external resources on our website.

If you're behind a web filter, please make sure that the domains *.kastatic.org and *.kasandbox.org are unblocked.

Main content

Course: LSAT (DEPRECATED) > Unit 1

Lesson 5: Analytical Reasoning – Worked examples

Grouping setup | Given info–basic | Worked example

Watch a demonstration of one way to approach a "Given info: basic orientation" question on a grouping setup from the analytical reasoning section of the LSAT. Created by Annie Hollister.

Want to join the conversation?

  • blobby green style avatar for user Natalia.Editor
    Hi, please note that in the video, option E is cut off on the bottom so you can't check your work before she explains it.
    (4 votes)
    Default Khan Academy avatar avatar for user
  • marcimus pink style avatar for user williams.briana95
    Could someone please explain choice A. Im confused because the instructor stated that the answer choice had inidigo but no yellow but in the second row of answer choice A yellow is included with inidigo.
    (2 votes)
    Default Khan Academy avatar avatar for user
    • blobby green style avatar for user David E Skogen
      Choice (A) violates the rule "Any costume that has indigo must have yellow" because the first of the three costumes listed (green, indigo, and orange) does not have yellow. The fact that the second costume (green, indigo, and yellow) adheres to this rule does not change the fact that the first costume violates it.
      (4 votes)
  • blobby green style avatar for user John Furagganan
    The explanation is so unclear. No two costumes can have the same color combination. Choice A has green, indigo, orange and the second costume is green, indigo, yellow. Those two are obviously two different combinations and it does not violate the rule that says "no two costumes can have the same color combination. However, in the overview, when indigo and yellow are considered a pair, red cannot be paired with yellow. What rule restricts red not to have yellow as part of the color combination? Can someone explain this nonsense?
    (1 vote)
    Default Khan Academy avatar avatar for user
  • blobby green style avatar for user Liz Gregory
    Shouldn't A be crossed off for having the same colors in it? After reading the first rule?
    (1 vote)
    Default Khan Academy avatar avatar for user

Video transcript

- [Instructor] Which one of the following could be the colors of each of the three costumes? With this type of question, a good approach is to take each rule in turn and cross off choices that violate that rule. So let's start with rule one, no two costumes can have the same color combination. It doesn't look like any of the choices violate this rule. In each of the choices, the three costumes have three different color combinations, so this doesn't help us rule out any options. Rule two says any costume that has indigo in it must also have yellow in it. So let's make sure that in all of the choices, any costume that has indigo also has yellow. Well, right away in A we see that one of the costumes here is green, indigo, and orange, which means that it has indigo in it but no yellow, so we can rule that out. In the rest of the choices, it looks like every costume that has indigo in it also has yellow in it, so the rest of the these comply with rule two. Rule three says any costume that has yellow in it must also have indigo in it. So let's make sure that everything with yellow also has indigo. In B that's fine. In C that's fine. In D that's fine. And in E we have a costume with green, white, and yellow, so this costume has yellow in it but no indigo, so we can rule out E. Rule four says if a costume has red in it, then it have neither indigo nor green in it. In C there's a costume that's green, orange, and red, so that violates this rule. And in D there's a costume that's indigo, red, and yellow, so this also violates that rule. This means that the only choice that works is B where the costumes are green, indigo, yellow; green, orange, and white; and orange, red, and white.