Physics

Projectile motion, mechanics and electricity and magnetism. Solid understanding of algebra and a basic understanding of trigonometry necessary.
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One-dimensional motion

In this tutorial we begin to explore ideas of velocity and acceleration. We do exciting things like throw things off of cliffs (far safer on paper than in real life) and see how high a ball will fly in the air.

Two-dimensional motion

You understand velocity and acceleration well in one-dimension. Now we can explore scenarios that are even more fun. With a little bit of trigonometry (you might want to review your basic trig, especially what sin and cos are), we can think about whether a baseball can clear the "green monster" at Fenway Park.

Forces and Newton's laws of motion

This tutorial is the meat of much of classical physics. We think about what a force is and how Newton changed the world's (and possibly your) view of how reality works.

Work and energy

Work and energy. Potential energy. Kinetic energy. Mechanical advantage. Springs and Hooke's law.

Impacts and linear momentum

Linear momentum. Conservation of momentum. Elastic collisions.

Moments, torque, and angular momentum

Thinking about making things rotate. Center of mass, torque, moments and angular velocity.

Gravitation

Classical gravity. How masses attract each other (according to Newton).

Oscillatory motion

Pendulums. Slinkies. You when you have to use the bathroom but it is occupied. These all go back and forth over and over and over again. This tutorial explores this type of motion.

Fluids

Atmospheric pressure is like an invisible friend who is always squeezing you with a big hug. Learn more about pressure, buoyant force, and flowing fluid so you can appreciate the sometimes invisible, but crucial, effect they have on us and the world around us.

Thermodynamics

Electricity and magnetism

Electrical circuits are all around us. The computer you're using to read this is full of them! Let's start to study how electrical charges interact.

Circuits

Mechanical waves and sound

Geometric optics

Light waves

One-dimensional motion

In this tutorial we begin to explore ideas of velocity and acceleration. We do exciting things like throw things off of cliffs (far safer on paper than in real life) and see how high a ball will fly in the air.
Community Questions
All content in “One-dimensional motion”

Displacement, velocity and time

This tutorial is the backbone of your understanding of kinematics (i.e., the motion of objects). You might already know that distance = rate x time. This tutorial essentially reviews that idea with a vector lens (we introduce you to vectors here as well). So strap your belts (actually this might not be necessary since we don't plan on decelerating in this tutorial) and prepare for a gentle ride of foundational physics knowledge.

Acceleration

In a world full of unbalanced forces (which you learn more about when you study Newton's laws), you will have acceleration (which is the rate in change of velocity). Whether you're thinking about how fast a Porsche can get to 60mph or how long it takes for a passenger plane to get to the necessary speed for flight, this tutorial will help.

Kinematic formulas and projectile motion

We don't believe in memorizing formulas and neither should you (unless you want to live your life as a shadow of your true potential). This tutorial builds on what we know about displacement, velocity and acceleration to solve problems in kinematics (including projectile motion problems). Along the way, we derive (and re-derive) some of the classic formulas that you might see in your physics book.

Old videos on projectile motion

This tutorial has some of the old videos that Sal first did around 2007. This content is covered elsewhere, but some folks like the raw (and masculine) simplicity of these first lessons (Sal added the bit about "masculine").