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How much electrolyte does a single cell need?

Observation: when we pull our cell out of the electrolyte it still causes a deflection, which increases when pressure is applied. How could this lead to more efficient batteries? Created by Brit Cruise.

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  • starky ultimate style avatar for user Michael Hybner
    What is in between the coins?
    (7 votes)
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  • leafers ultimate style avatar for user eightsquare
    I think there is still some electrolyte left in between the coins(in the 'sponge'). Either that or once the electricity erodes the surface of the metals they continue reacting. I think the first explanation is correct. Am I right?
    (6 votes)
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    • leaf red style avatar for user aubrey
      The spongy material between the two metals can replace the cup of saltwater because it has salt water absorbed within it! Therefor the cup of salt water is unnecessary except to re-wet the sponge!
      (2 votes)
  • hopper happy style avatar for user sivani y
    is blood an electrolyte or a non electrolyte?
    (2 votes)
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  • leafers ultimate style avatar for user eightsquare
    Maybe off topic, but I don't know where to ask it. When we dissolve CuCl2 in water, the Chlorine takes Copper's electrons and becomes negatively charged. Copper becomes positively charged. When we insert an anode and a cathode, and connect the negative end of the power to the cathode, and apply potential difference, the copper ions move toward the cathode, accept electrons and get deposited there. This is electrolysis. The chlorine anions move towards the positive anode and lose their electrons, and this continues. A question. Chlorine is extremely electronegative, so why is it compelled to lose electrons? Also a normal Cl2 molecule dissolved wont conduct electricity, so why do ions? Thanks!
    (3 votes)
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  • starky sapling style avatar for user ♡ Lonely Umbreon ♡
    The deflection doesn't return to 0 because of the sponge in between the coins. It sucked in some of the salt water and caused the deflection to decrease, but not disappear. Am I right?
    (1 vote)
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  • duskpin ultimate style avatar for user Niyati
    why cant they talk instead of subtitles?
    (1 vote)
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  • piceratops tree style avatar for user ansh shah
    What were the coins made up of? they might be working on thelogic that metals give electrons and with an electrolite they can for an ionic circuit causing current in the wires.
    (1 vote)
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  • primosaur ultimate style avatar for user Aiden Swayne
    What would happen if they used lass wire?
    (1 vote)
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  • mr pink red style avatar for user jc99612510
    do u have to use water to test the experiment ?
    (1 vote)
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  • leaf green style avatar for user Ricky Mathews
    So one coin is still positively charged and the other negatively charged, so there's still some voltage between them? Giving a capacitance of sorts? I'm a little confused. If there is a voltage between them, that would give potential energy but what kind of potential energy is it? Since it's transforming into electromagnetic (or kinetic energy of the conventional current).
    (1 vote)
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Video transcript

Deflection is zero. Deflection does not return to zero. Squeeze coins together. Deflection increases! Do we need the cup?