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Video transcript

many times in chemistry will see different molecules that have the same constituent atoms for example these two molecules here they both have four carbons one two three four one two three four so if I were to write their chemical formula BC four and then they both have one two three four five six seven eight nine ten one two three four five six seven eight nine ten hydrogen's so both of them both of them have the chemical formula c4h10 c4h10 but they're still fundamentally different molecules and you can see that because they have different bonding for example over here we have a carbon that is bonded to three other carbons in a hydrogen over here I can't find any carbon that's bonded to three other carbons I can find ones that are bonded to two other carbons but not one that's bonded to three other carbons so how we've put the atoms together is actually different they're bonded to different things and so when we have this situation where you have the same constituent atoms where you have the same chemical formula but you're still dealing with different different molecules because of either/or what they're how they're how their bonds are made or how they're what their shape is we call those isomers so an isomer isomer you have the same chemical formula same chemical formula formula but you could have different bonding but different different bonding bonding or shape bonding shape or orientation or orientation so over here you have just different bonding and this type of isomer is called a structural isomer so these characters are structural isomers same constituent atoms but different bonding structural isomers so that's structural isomers right right over there