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Creativity break: how do you apply creativity to biology?

Hear from biology professionals about how they apply creativity to biology. Created by Khan Academy.

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  • sneak peak green style avatar for user G. Tarun
    I love how Dr. Ramsey gets meta about creativity - using creativity to explain creativity in biology! Those analogies, engaging presentation style, rigorous and fun explanations - super-creative!
    (4 votes)
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  • blobby green style avatar for user Jor'DanC
    I love how Dr. Ramsey gets meta about creativity - using creativity to explain creativity in biology! Those analogies, engaging presentation style, rigorous and fun explanations
    (1 vote)
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Video transcript

(upbeat music) - One question that people ask me is how do I apply creativity to the presentations that I give? And my secret sauce is to come up with a visual image that anybody, I don't care if you're the adult, whether you're a fifth grader or second grader, that you can grasp that concept, and here's my favorite one. So every single time you move your body, there's whole bunches of neurochemicals that are released in your brain. And you've heard of these neurochemicals, dopamine, noradrenaline, serotonin. And so that's the fact, but the image that I give is that every single time you move your body, it's like giving your brain a wonderful bubble bath of neurochemicals that enrich your brain that change that neurochemical milieu, and that is the image that everybody that comes to my talks leaves with and inspires them a little bit to move their body more. So can you come up with that image, that playful fun, but factually accurate image that conveys your message? That will be your secret sauce too. - Have you heard that the bees aren't doing great? Well, I've been studying that and trying to understand how their complex health issues connect to a curious little parasite that's in nearly every honeybee colony worldwide. it's called Varroa destructor, by the way. Now, before I started this study, we thought that it was an open and shut case that the parasite was sucking out the bee's blood, sort of like a tick on a puppy, but I thought something more strange might be going on. The damage that it caused just didn't seem like the damage that would be caused by blood removal. The feeding process is super difficult to see though, so I had this idea. I fed different color glowing food to the bees in their pollen and their sugar water to color their organs specific colors. Then when the parasite fed on the bees, I could tell which organ it was eating based on which color was in its digestive system. And it turns out they were eating the bees' liver, by the way, which is pretty weird. But this kind of work is actually pretty fun, and it was definitely a place where creativity was rewarded in biology. (upbeat music)