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Main content
Current time:0:00Total duration:1:44
AP.STATS:
UNC‑1 (EU)
,
UNC‑1.P (LO)
,
UNC‑1.P.3 (EK)
CCSS.Math: ,

Video transcript

the two-way table of column relative frequencies below shows data on gender and voting preferences during the 2012 United States presidential election they give us all of this data they give us this as they say the to a table of column relative frequencies so for example this column right over here is men the column total is 1 or you could say a hundred percent and we could see that 0.42 of the men or 42% of the men voted for Obama we can see 52% of the men or 0.5 two of the men voted for Romney and we can see that the other that the neither Oh BA or 6% went for neither Obama or nor Romney and for women 52% went for Obama 43% went for Romney 5% went for other and then these this 52 plus 43 plus 5 will add up to 100% of the women during the 2012 United States presidential election were male voters more likely to vote for Romney than female voters so let's see if we there's a couple of ways you could think about it well actually let's go this way male voters if you are a man 52% of them voted for Romney while for the women 43% of them voted for Romney so a man was more likely there is a if you randomly picked a man who voted there was a 52% chance they voted for Romney well if you randomly picked a woman there was a 43% a woman who voted there was a 43% chance that she voted for Romney so yes when male voters were more likely to vote for Romney than female voters so the answer is yes and we're done