Probability and statistics

We dare you to go through a day in which you never consider or use probability. Did you check the weather forecast? Busted! Did you decide to go through the drive through lane vs walk in? Busted again! We are constantly creating hypotheses, making predictions, testing, and analyzing. Our lives are full of probabilities! Statistics is related to probability because much of the data we use when determining probable outcomes comes from our understanding of statistics. In these tutorials, we will cover a range of topics, some which include: independent events, dependent probability, combinatorics, hypothesis testing, descriptive statistics, random variables, probability distributions, regression, and inferential statistics. So buckle up and hop on for a wild ride. We bet you're going to be challenged AND love it!
Community Questions

Independent and dependent events

Introduction to probability. Independent and dependent events. Compound events. Mutual exclusive events. Addition rule for probability.

Probability and combinatorics

Permutations and combinations. Using combinatorics to solve questions in probability.

Statistical studies

Descriptive statistics

Measures of central tendency and dispersion. Mean, median, mode, variance, and standard deviation.

Random variables and probability distributions

Random variables. Expected value. Probability distributions (both discrete and continuous). Binomial distribution. Poisson processes.

Regression

Fitting a line to points. Linear regression. R-squared.

Inferential statistics

Making inferences based on sample data. Confidence intervals. Margin of error. Hypothesis testing.

Descriptive statistics

Measures of central tendency and dispersion. Mean, median, mode, variance, and standard deviation.
Community Questions
All content in “Descriptive statistics”

Box-and-whisker plots

Whether you're looking at scientific data or stock price charts, box-and-whisker plots can show up in your life. This tutorial covers what they are, how to read them and how to construct them. We'd consider this tutorial very optional, but it is a good application of dealing with medians and ranges.

Sal's old statistics videos

This tutorial covers central tendency and dispersion. It is redundant with the other tutorials on this topic, but it has the benefit of messy handwriting and a cheap microphone. This is Sal circa 2007 so take it all with a grain of salt (or just skip it altogether).