If you're seeing this message, it means we're having trouble loading external resources on our website.

If you're behind a web filter, please make sure that the domains *.kastatic.org and *.kasandbox.org are unblocked.

Main content

Word problems with volume

Sal solves some practice problems using volume.

Want to join the conversation?

  • female robot ada style avatar for user jn9020471
    If I have, say, 1,500 milliliters of milk. Could I then say that I have 1.5 Liters of milk? What about 1 Liter and 500 milliliters? Just interested
    (6 votes)
    Default Khan Academy avatar avatar for user
  • purple pi teal style avatar for user Alex white
    what is the highest number ever made
    (3 votes)
    Default Khan Academy avatar avatar for user
    • male robot johnny style avatar for user 🅹🅾🅷🅽🅽🆈INACTIVE
      There is no "Highest Number". I'll even prove it to you. Tell me the highest number you know, and I will come up with an even higher number. Although there is no highest number, there is the concept of infinity. Infinity just means that numbers can be as high or as small as desired. Infinity means that you can never find the highest number, because you can add another positive number, and that number will be higher than your "old highest number". Hope this helps! -Johnny Unidas.
      (6 votes)
  • starky tree style avatar for user tristan.calhoun
    what is volume not volume like the volume on a computer
    (5 votes)
    Default Khan Academy avatar avatar for user
  • piceratops sapling style avatar for user wskowronski
    how many gallons are in a pool
    (4 votes)
    Default Khan Academy avatar avatar for user
  • male robot donald style avatar for user QUANG MINH
    - [Voiceover] Li Min squeezed three lemons to make lemonade. She squeezed 42 millimeters of lemon juice from the first lemon. 36 milliliters of juice from the second lemon, and 45 milliliters of juice from the third lemon. How much lemon juice did Li MIn squeeze from her three lemons? Well we just have to add how many milliliters she got from each of them, add them all together. So from the first one, she got 42 milliliters 42, and short for milliliters I can write lowercase m for mili, and uppercase L for liters. 42 milliliters from the first lemon. 36 milliliters from the second lemon, and then 45 milliliters from the third lemon. So we can just add these three quantities together. So let's do that, let's add them together. So we're gonna get something in terms of milliliters. So let's go first to the ones place. Two plus six is eight, eight plus five is 13. 13 is three ones and one 10, so I could write that one 10 in the 10s place. So one plus four is five, plus three is eight, plus four is 12, so it's gonna be 12 10s. Which is the same thing as 120. So in total, Li Min squeezed 123 milliliters from her three lemons. Let's do another problem like this. Sarah poured five cans of motor oil into the container below. So this container below has 55, let's see this is halfway, it's filled up after she poured the five cans, and it's filled up halfway between 40 and 50, so this mark right here, this looks like that would be 45. So it's filled up to 45 milliliters. So she poured five cans, and those five cans combined ended up being 45 milliliters. All of the cans held the same amount of oil, and I guess we can assume that this container below was empty before she filled any of the cans in. So all of the cans held the same amount of oil. How many milliliters of motor oil were in each can? So she had five cans, so one, one can, two cans, three cans, four cans, and five cans. They each had a certain amount of oil in them. They each had a certain amount of oil in them. And when she put them all in, so let's say they each have a question mark of oil in them. So she had five cans, and they each had a question mark amount, say question mark milliliters of oil in it. And when you multiplied by five, when you put all five together you got 45 milliliters. You got 45 milliliters. So five times what amount of oil per can would get us to 45 in total? Well five times nine is 45. So this thing right over here, five times nine is 45. So Sarah had nine milliliters in each can, they each had the same amount, they say that. All the cans held the same amount of oil. So if she had nine milliliters in each one, notice, if in each of the five cans you had nine milliliters, five times nine is 45. So she had nine milliliters of motor oil in each can.
    (5 votes)
    Default Khan Academy avatar avatar for user
  • aqualine tree style avatar for user AlexisR
    so i add it ?like this. 46ml and 32ml then 46ml 32ml ( 7 8ml )
    (5 votes)
    Default Khan Academy avatar avatar for user
  • blobby green style avatar for user hs3939
    I understand know
    (3 votes)
    Default Khan Academy avatar avatar for user
  • leaf yellow style avatar for user SP
    What if 1,700 milliliter = 17 liters
    (2 votes)
    Default Khan Academy avatar avatar for user
    • female robot grace style avatar for user Jove
      1700 milliliter is not equal to 17 liters, it is actually 1 7/10 liters.

      If I wanted to have a 1700 milliliter bottle of soda for a party, but someone brought 17 liters, that would be way too much, it would be like a large bucket of soda.
      (3 votes)
  • aqualine tree style avatar for user AlexisR
    you are coll i lernd a lot
    (3 votes)
    Default Khan Academy avatar avatar for user
  • leafers tree style avatar for user jiaqingli188
    what is the volume of an ant side drop
    (2 votes)
    Default Khan Academy avatar avatar for user

Video transcript

- [Voiceover] Li Min squeezed three lemons to make lemonade. She squeezed 42 millimeters of lemon juice from the first lemon. 36 milliliters of juice from the second lemon, and 45 milliliters of juice from the third lemon. How much lemon juice did Li MIn squeeze from her three lemons? Well we just have to add how many milliliters she got from each of them, add them all together. So from the first one, she got 42 milliliters 42, and short for milliliters I can write lowercase m for mili, and uppercase L for liters. 42 milliliters from the first lemon. 36 milliliters from the second lemon, and then 45 milliliters from the third lemon. So we can just add these three quantities together. So let's do that, let's add them together. So we're gonna get something in terms of milliliters. So let's go first to the ones place. Two plus six is eight, eight plus five is 13. 13 is three ones and one 10, so I could write that one 10 in the 10s place. So one plus four is five, plus three is eight, plus four is 12, so it's gonna be 12 10s. Which is the same thing as 120. So in total, Li Min squeezed 123 milliliters from her three lemons. Let's do another problem like this. Sarah poured five cans of motor oil into the container below. So this container below has 55, let's see this is halfway, it's filled up after she poured the five cans, and it's filled up halfway between 40 and 50, so this mark right here, this looks like that would be 45. So it's filled up to 45 milliliters. So she poured five cans, and those five cans combined ended up being 45 milliliters. All of the cans held the same amount of oil, and I guess we can assume that this container below was empty before she filled any of the cans in. So all of the cans held the same amount of oil. How many milliliters of motor oil were in each can? So she had five cans, so one, one can, two cans, three cans, four cans, and five cans. They each had a certain amount of oil in them. They each had a certain amount of oil in them. And when she put them all in, so let's say they each have a question mark of oil in them. So she had five cans, and they each had a question mark amount, say question mark milliliters of oil in it. And when you multiplied by five, when you put all five together you got 45 milliliters. You got 45 milliliters. So five times what amount of oil per can would get us to 45 in total? Well five times nine is 45. So this thing right over here, five times nine is 45. So Sarah had nine milliliters in each can, they each had the same amount, they say that. All the cans held the same amount of oil. So if she had nine milliliters in each one, notice, if in each of the five cans you had nine milliliters, five times nine is 45. So she had nine milliliters of motor oil in each can.