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Identifying numerators and denominators

Sal identifying numerators and denominators in fractions.  Created by Sal Khan and Monterey Institute for Technology and Education.

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  • blobby green style avatar for user Omar Carmona
    Can someone give me an in-depth explanation of what are numerators and denominators? Give me a definitive definition of a fraction!
    I am confused...
    (1 vote)
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  • mr pink red style avatar for user sophia.coddington
    Why is a numerator called a numerator and why is it o n the top?
    (6 votes)
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    • piceratops ultimate style avatar for user EmmaB
      It's just the name it's been given same for Denominator although Denominator seems to also be called the Dominant number because it's the Total of the Parts/Pieces/Objects and the Whole Shape, but i wouldn't think too much about the names, lots of things are given names just to help identify them.

      We don't know why Numerator is on top either it just is, i guess it does make more sense to be the top number since that's the number you're taking from the Total Parts/Pieces, that's where our mind would go first it would be like "So i'm taking or adding this From/To this" that's my guess :)
      (3 votes)
  • blobby green style avatar for user fadhillahilhamm22
    I get lost between the difference of "The number of equal parts in all the wholes" and "The number of equal parts in one whole" in the practice question. Can someone explain it to me? thanks!
    (4 votes)
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    • stelly blue style avatar for user Kim Seidel
      I just looked at a couple of the practice problems. The denominator = the number of equal parts that make one whole unit. The numerator is the number of parts you are counting. The option for "the number of equal parts in all the wholes" appears to be a false option to see if you understand the meaning for numerator/denominator. It really doesn't fit the definition of either one.
      (3 votes)
  • duskpin ultimate style avatar for user Briggs Dommert
    Why is the bottom of the fraction called a denominator?
    (4 votes)
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  • blobby green style avatar for user sarah miller
    I've been trying to understand these questions, I continue to level down on being able to recognize fractions. I'm not getting it.can someone break this down for me please.
    (3 votes)
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    • primosaur seed style avatar for user Ian Pulizzotto
      When a figure is divided into equal parts, the fraction that is represented by the shaded area is the number of parts shaded over the total number of parts.

      Example: suppose a figure is divided into 7 equal parts. Suppose 4 of the parts are shaded (so 3 of the parts are unshaded). Then the shaded area would represent the fraction 4/7.

      Have a blessed, wonderful day!
      (3 votes)
  • aqualine sapling style avatar for user emma.hutchinson185
    i am SOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO bored like i will be listening to my teach and she asked me a quistion and i wont even know wat the heck shes been talking about and i dont think anyone else does eather
    (3 votes)
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  • aqualine ultimate style avatar for user ~ Holly Jean ~
    the denominator is the bottom and the numerator is the number on top??
    (3 votes)
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    • old spice man green style avatar for user S.MilesJones
      What helps me remember is that the "denominator" and "down" both start with a "d". If I remember that the Denominator is on the bottom (Down), then I know that the numerator has to be on top.

      A math teacher taught this to me a long time ago and still use it to help me remember.
      (0 votes)
  • aqualine ultimate style avatar for user anabelleP
    why is math really good for our brain
    (2 votes)
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    • blobby green style avatar for user XuperXofi
      We use math like everyday and all the time, so it’s good that when you go to school, you learn math when you are still young. Young minds can capture more easier than older minds. Math is good for our brain because they help us solve problems
      (2 votes)
  • blobby green style avatar for user jayden91206
    Is 4/5 = to 8/10 or more than 8/10
    (3 votes)
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  • starky seed style avatar for user 1974193128
    why is it called a denonminater
    (2 votes)
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Video transcript

We're asked to identify the numerator and denominator in the fraction 3 over 4, or 3/4. So let's rewrite this just so it's nice and big. So let me just write the fraction. So we have 3 over 4, 3/4. Now, they want us to identify the numerator and the denominator. So the numerator is just the number on top, so the numerator is the 3 right there. And then they want us to find the denominator. The denominator is just the number on the bottom. It's the 4. So if they say what's the numerator? 3. What's the denominator? It's 4, just the number on the bottom. They could've just called this the number on the bottom. They could've just called this the number on top. Now to think about what this represents, what this fraction represents, you can think of it as three out of four pieces of a pie. That's how I think about it. So you can imagine, the denominator tells us, what are we taking a fraction out of or how many pieces are there? So let's imagine a pie like this. So we could draw like a square pie. So this is what the denominator represents. This is what the number on the bottom represents. And then 3 says, we are representing three of those four pieces. So this 3 tells us that out of 4 possible ones, I guess you could think of it, we are using three, or maybe we're eating three. So you can imagine if someone says I ate three-fourths of a pie-- this would be read as three-fourths-- they're eating the blue portion of the pie if we cut it this way. If we imagine a round pie, it would look like this. Let me draw a round pie. So that is my round pie. Let me cut it into four equal pieces or roughly equal pieces. And if someone says I ate three-fourths of this pie, where the 3 is the numerator, and then the 4, and you'd read that as three-fourths, the 4 is the denominator, they would eat this much of the pie. They would eat 3 of the 4 pieces. So this is is one piece, this is two pieces, and this is three pieces. So you could imagine the 4, the denominator represents the total number of pieces in the pie, and then the 3 represents how many of those we ate.