Factors, multiples and patterns

We know that 3x2x5 = 30. So 2, 3, and 5 are factors of 30. 30 is a multiple of each of 3, 2, and 5. If a number only has itself and 1 as factors, then the number is "prime". Don't worry, this is explained in much more depth in the tutorials in this topic. We will also explore some mathematical patterns.
Try some practice problems
Learn by doing or check your understanding

In this tutorial, we'll begin to think about the numbers that "make up" the number. This will be useful throughout our study of math. Whether we are adding fractions, exploring mystical number patterns, or breaking computer codes, factoring numbers are key! Let's go, kids! Common Core Standard: 4.OA.B.4

Prime numbers have been studied by mathematicians and mystics for ages (seriously). They are both basic and mysterious. The more you explore them, the more you will realize that the universe is a fascinating place. This tutorial will introduce you to the magical world of prime numbers as well as their composite number brethren. Common Core Standard: 4.OA.B.4

Let's now use our mathematical toolkit to discover and make use of patterns! This is a seriously fun tutorial.