If you're seeing this message, it means we're having trouble loading external resources on our website.

If you're behind a web filter, please make sure that the domains *.kastatic.org and *.kasandbox.org are unblocked.

Main content

Decimals in written form (hundredths)

To write a decimal in word form, start by writing out the whole number portion. Next, express the decimal portion as a fraction of hundredths. For clarity, it's often helpful to simplify multiple terms (such as "one tenth and five hundredths") into a single fraction (such as "fifteen hundredths"). Created by Sal Khan and Monterey Institute for Technology and Education.

Want to join the conversation?

  • duskpin ultimate style avatar for user Lilyflower82
    when the guy wrote 63.15 in word form, he said: sixty-three and fifteen hundredths. Though I'm not saying he's wrong or anything, but instead of saying "and" do you say "point"? So sixty-three point fifteen hundredths?
    (2 votes)
    Default Khan Academy avatar avatar for user
  • sneak peak purple style avatar for user mcclellankairiN
    word form, and I'm not saying it out loud because that would give the answer away. We have 63.15 that we want to write in word form. Well, the stuff to the left of the decimal point is pretty straightforward. Let me actually color code it. So we have 6, 3. Let me do it all in different colors. And then we have a decimal, and then we have a 1 and a 5. There's one common way of doing this, but we'll talk about the different ways you could express this as a word. But we know how to write this stuff to the left. This is pretty straightforward. This is just sixty-three. Let me write that down. So this is sixty-three. And instead of the decimal, we'll write, and. Now there's two ways to go here. We could say, and one tenth and five hundredths, or we could just say, look, this is fifteen hundredths. One tenth is ten hundredths. So one tenth and five hundredths is fifteen hundredths. So maybe I can write it like this: sixty-three and fifteen hundredths. Just like that. Now, it might have been a little bit more natural to say, how come I don't say one tenth and then five hundredths? And you could, but that would just make it a little bit harder for someone's brain to process it when you say it. So it could have been sixty-three-- so let me copy and paste that. It could be sixty-three and, and then you would write, one tenth for this digit right there, and five hundredths. Sixty-three and one tenth and five hundredths is hard for most people's brains to process. But if you say, fifteen hundredths, people get what you're saying. Not to beat a dead horse, but this right here, this is 1/10 right here and then this is 5/100, 5 over 100. But if you were to add these two, If you were to add 1/10 plus 5/100 -- so let's do that. If you were to add 1/10 plus 5/100, how would you do it? You need a common denominator. 100 is divisible by both 10 and 100, so multiply both the numerator and denominator of this character by 10. You get 10 on the top and 100 on the bottom. 1/10 is the same thing as 10 over 100. 10/100 plus 5/100 is equal to 15 over 100, so this piece right here is equal to 15/100. And that's why we say sixty-three and fifteen hundredths.
    Creative Commons Attribution/Non-Commercial/Share-Alike
    Video on YouTube🥲
    (7 votes)
    Default Khan Academy avatar avatar for user
  • female robot ada style avatar for user Dragon or Andi
    whats a good way to rember to go like 10 over 100 after the decimal?


    (2 votes)
    Default Khan Academy avatar avatar for user
  • sneak peak purple style avatar for user mcclellankairiN
    is it only me or is it been 11 years since this vid came out
    (5 votes)
    Default Khan Academy avatar avatar for user
  • male robot hal style avatar for user Bryson Stuart
    How would you say .3333 repeated? Would you just round it to .33?
    (5 votes)
    Default Khan Academy avatar avatar for user
  • marcimus purple style avatar for user nninness24
    I need help on dividing decimals and fractions.
    (2 votes)
    Default Khan Academy avatar avatar for user
    • duskpin ultimate style avatar for user ŦΔ𝓈Mⓘy𝐀   .̮.
      Well, I know how to divide fractions. With practice it is simple!
      Here is an example:
      5/6 divided by 2/5
      First, you have to flip the second fraction. So now the second fraction is 5/2 ( which by the way is a improper fraction). Now you turn the division sign into a multiplication sign. So now the equation is 5/6 times 5/2. And now you just multiply the fractions like any other problem and BOOM! you got it. By the way the answer is 25/12 or, simplified, 2 1/12
      (2 votes)
  • duskpin sapling style avatar for user Logan
    why do you say tenths and hundredths instead of point somthing?
    example:

    five and fifty three hundreds v.s five point fifty three
    (3 votes)
    Default Khan Academy avatar avatar for user
    • leafers ultimate style avatar for user KathyC
      The "point" way of saying is is a short-cut way. It's still right but it doesn't help new students learn what the place values mean and it doesn't help those students see that decimals and fractions are the same thing.
      For example:
      five point three six
      OR
      five and thirty-six hundreths.
      Both are correct but it's easy to see that the second one is not only 5.36, it's also the same as 5 36/100
      (3 votes)
  • blobby green style avatar for user Shereen Makhanye
    Maybe you can say 5.5 like this: five point five

    PS: thank you for being the best
    (3 votes)
    Default Khan Academy avatar avatar for user
  • old spice man green style avatar for user Alternative.creature1
    So at to 0.06
    what did it mean that you would give away the answer ? How would you give away the answer if you haven't even write it in word from yet?>
    (1 vote)
    Default Khan Academy avatar avatar for user
  • leafers ultimate style avatar for user ladybugandchatnior
    i'm so cunfused
    (3 votes)
    Default Khan Academy avatar avatar for user

Video transcript

We're asked to write this right here in word form, and I'm not saying it out loud because that would give the answer away. We have 63.15 that we want to write in word form. Well, the stuff to the left of the decimal point is pretty straightforward. Let me actually color code it. So we have 6, 3. Let me do it all in different colors. And then we have a decimal, and then we have a 1 and a 5. There's one common way of doing this, but we'll talk about the different ways you could express this as a word. But we know how to write this stuff to the left. This is pretty straightforward. This is just sixty-three. Let me write that down. So this is sixty-three. And instead of the decimal, we'll write, and. Now there's two ways to go here. We could say, and one tenth and five hundredths, or we could just say, look, this is fifteen hundredths. One tenth is ten hundredths. So one tenth and five hundredths is fifteen hundredths. So maybe I can write it like this: sixty-three and fifteen hundredths. Just like that. Now, it might have been a little bit more natural to say, how come I don't say one tenth and then five hundredths? And you could, but that would just make it a little bit harder for someone's brain to process it when you say it. So it could have been sixty-three-- so let me copy and paste that. It could be sixty-three and, and then you would write, one tenth for this digit right there, and five hundredths. Sixty-three and one tenth and five hundredths is hard for most people's brains to process. But if you say, fifteen hundredths, people get what you're saying. Not to beat a dead horse, but this right here, this is 1/10 right here and then this is 5/100, 5 over 100. But if you were to add these two, If you were to add 1/10 plus 5/100 -- so let's do that. If you were to add 1/10 plus 5/100, how would you do it? You need a common denominator. 100 is divisible by both 10 and 100, so multiply both the numerator and denominator of this character by 10. You get 10 on the top and 100 on the bottom. 1/10 is the same thing as 10 over 100. 10/100 plus 5/100 is equal to 15 over 100, so this piece right here is equal to 15/100. And that's why we say sixty-three and fifteen hundredths.