If you're seeing this message, it means we're having trouble loading external resources on our website.

If you're behind a web filter, please make sure that the domains *.kastatic.org and *.kasandbox.org are unblocked.

Main content

Pattern when dividing by tenths and hundredths

.

Want to join the conversation?

  • stelly orange style avatar for user skyler.waugh
    how does 50 tenths x 5 tenths = 10
    (9 votes)
    Default Khan Academy avatar avatar for user
  • starky sapling style avatar for user jorgeo1010
    When you divide something you are figuring out how many times the number fits into your original number. When you divide a number by 1, you will get the number you started with because 1 always fits into a number the same amount of times as that number is big. For example, 7 divided by 1 is 7 because 1 can fit into 7, 7 times. For numbers greater than one they will fit into your original number less times because they are greater. For numbers less than 1, they will fit into your original number more times than the value of your number, therefore, giving you an answer bigger than the number you started with.

    For example 4 divided by 0.1 or 1/10th (0.1 and 1/10 are the same number)
    What the question is asking is how many times does 0.1 fit into 4? How many 0.1's added together make 4? The answer is 40, because 0.1, forty different times, will make 4.
    (2 votes)
    Default Khan Academy avatar avatar for user
  • aqualine ultimate style avatar for user Maria Jose'R
    what is 345x890?
    (2 votes)
    Default Khan Academy avatar avatar for user
  • male robot donald style avatar for user random booster vol. unknown
    im honestly confused one how the number would be BIGGER if you DIVIDE so can someone plz xplain this to me
    (1 vote)
    Default Khan Academy avatar avatar for user
    • starky sapling style avatar for user KC
      When you divide something you are figuring out how many times the number fits into your original number. When you divide a number by 1, you will get the number you started with because 1 always fits into a number the same amount of times as that number is big. For example, 7 divided by 1 is 7 because 1 can fit into 7, 7 times. For numbers greater than one they will fit into your original number less times because they are greater. For numbers less than 1, they will fit into your original number more times than the value of your number, therefore, giving you an answer bigger than the number you started with.

      For example 4 divided by 0.1 or 1/10th (0.1 and 1/10 are the same number)
      What the question is asking is how many times does 0.1 fit into 4? How many 0.1's added together make 4? The answer is 40, because 0.1, forty different times, will make 4.
      (2 votes)
  • aqualine ultimate style avatar for user cai the cat
    ❔ do you divide hundredths by tenths
    (1 vote)
    Default Khan Academy avatar avatar for user
  • duskpin ultimate style avatar for user sneha anand
    50 tenths and 5 tenths r the same. So when u add them it becomes 10 tenths (i think) probably
    (0 votes)
    Default Khan Academy avatar avatar for user
    • starky sapling style avatar for user ⓒⓡⓔⓐⓜⓨⓑⓤⓣⓣⓔⓡ
      Sneha, I think this is getting pretty confusing to you. I'll ask you this: are 50 hundredths and 5 hundredths the same? Think about this and you'll understand it better. Okay, 50 hundredths CANNOT be represented in one place value. So you regroup all those 10 hundredths to get 0.5 (5 tenths). Now do the addition: 0.5 + 0.5. You are right, we'll get 10 tenths; it's just that you had it written down wrong.

      I got notifications and am writing this reply.
      (4 votes)
  • duskpin sapling style avatar for user Daniela

    But if is 6÷0.2 you do not have 120 (that is the result if you X) you have 30. What is the pattern?
    (1 vote)
    Default Khan Academy avatar avatar for user
  • leafers tree style avatar for user andrew.hubler167
    At time stamp it makes no sense
    (1 vote)
    Default Khan Academy avatar avatar for user
  • blobby green style avatar for user JosiahC
    how does 2x10=the same thing
    (0 votes)
    Default Khan Academy avatar avatar for user
  • winston baby style avatar for user Winston
    I still don't get it. At he says 'I'm going to have 20 groups of one.', Could someone please explain in further detail please? Thanks.
    (0 votes)
    Default Khan Academy avatar avatar for user

Video transcript

- [Instructor] Let's see if we can figure out what two divided by 0.1 or one tenth is. Pause this video and see if you can figure that out. All right, now let's work through this together. And there's a couple of ways that we can approach it. One way is to think about everything in terms of tenths. So two wholes is how many tenths? Well, a whole is equal to 10 tenths, so two wholes is equal to 20 tenths. So I could write the two, rewrite the two, as 20 tenths. And so that's going to be 20 tenths divided by, and instead of writing it this way, I could, instead of just writing it as 0.1, we know this is the same thing as one tenth. So divided by one tenth. And so if I have 20 of something and if I divide it by, into groups of one of that something, how many groups am I going to have? Well, I'm going to have 20 equal groups of one. So 20 tenths divided by one tenth is equal to 20. Another way that you could approach that is you could rewrite the 0.1, the one tenth, as a fraction. We could rewrite this as two divided by, divided by, instead of writing one tenth like this, I could write it as a fraction, divided by 1/10. Well, we know that dividing by a tenth is the same thing as multiplying by 10. So this is going to be equal to two times, two times 10. And that gets us to the same place that we had before. What is two times 10? Well, that is going to be equal to 20. That's good, that we got to the same answer, otherwise these would not be equivalent methods. Let's do another example. So let's say we wanted to figure out what six divided by one tenth is. Pause this video and see if you can figure that out. All right, well, you could do the same idea. Six wholes is equal to how many tenths? It's equal to 60 tenths. So I'll rewrite this as 60 tenths, divided by one tenth, is equal to how many, is equal to what? Well, if I have 60 of something and if I divide it into groups of one of that something, I'm gonna have 60 equal groups of one. So this is going to be equal to 60. So you might see a pattern. When we divide it by a tenth, we end up multiplying by 10. When we divide by a tenth, we are multiplying by 10. And you could do the same thing as we saw up here. You could take, you could say six divided by one tenth is the same thing as six divided by one tenth written as a fraction, which is going to be equal to six times, you could say six times 10 or six times 10 over one, either way. Six times 10 over one. Or, which is the same thing as 10, which is once again going to be equal to 60. So I think you see the general pattern. Divide by a tenth, same thing as multiplying by 10. Now, what about if we dealt with hundredths? So let's say we wanna figure out what seven divided by a hundredth is. What would this be? Pause the video and try to figure it out. All right, well, we can do the same drill. So seven wholes, one whole is equal to a hundred hundredths, so seven wholes is equal to 700 hundredths. So this is equal to, I'll write it like this, 700 hundredths, hundredths, divided by, divided by one hundredth, one hundredth. If I have 700 of something and if I'm dividing it into equal groups of one of that something, I'm gonna have 700 equal groups. So this is going to be equal to 700. So you divide by a hundredth, is the same thing as multiplying by a hundred. Now, you could also rewrite this as fraction if you like, so that some of the principles we saw up here still apply. So we could rewrite this as seven divided by 1/100, and so this is going to be the same thing as seven times a hundred over one, or seven times a hundred. Seven times 100, which, once again, will get you to 700. So I think you see a pattern. Divide by a tenth, same thing as multiplying by 10. Divide by a hundredth, same thing as multiplying by a hundred.