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Graphing lines from slope-intercept form review

Slope intercept form is y=mx+b, where m is slope and b is the y-intercept. We can use this form of a linear equation to draw the graph of that equation on the x-y coordinate plane.
Slope intercept form is y, equals, m, x, plus, b, where m is slope and b is the y-intercept.
Slope-intercept form is nice when you're drawing graphs.
For example, imagine we're given the equation y, equals, 2, x, plus, 7 and asked to graph it.
Straight from the equation, we know the y-intercept is 7.
A first quadrant coordinate plane. The x- and y-axes each scale by one. The point zero, seven is plotted.
And we know the slope is 2.
start text, S, l, o, p, e, end text, equals, start fraction, delta, y, divided by, delta, x, end fraction, equals, start fraction, 2, divided by, 1, end fraction, equals, 2
So, for every one unit we go to the right, we must go up two units:
A first quadrant coordinate plane. The x- and y-axes each scale by one. A graph of a line goes through the points zero, seven and one, nine which are plotted. There is a horizontal segment from zero, seven to one, seven. There is a vertical line from one, seven to two, nine.
Here is our final graph:
A first quadrant coordinate plane. The x- and y-axes each scale by one. The equation y equals two x plus seven is graphed.
Want to learn more about graphing equation from slope-intercept form? Check out this video.

Practice

Problem 1
Graph the following equation.
y, equals, minus, 4, x, minus, 1

Want more practice? Check out this exercise.

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