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Comparing fractions: number line

Sal compares fractions on a number line.

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  • aqualine ultimate style avatar for user ShyanneL
    is it easy to do fractions on a number line?
    (5 votes)
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    • piceratops seed style avatar for user ???
      Pretty much. because you can write two consecutive numbers on a nunmber line
      (for example 0-I----1 then you count how many spaces between the numbers and start so that example would be 0 2/7
      (5 votes)
  • male robot donald style avatar for user Mazhar Baloch
    Compare 2/3 and 6/8 i think the answer is 2/3 which is closer to whole or they are both equal but when ever i give the test it says 6/8 is greater than 2/3 and why do this website even after being so well known have so many mistakes confusing questions once i complete everything from class 4 to collage i will help make this site better it is helping me the process is so slow alot of mistakes alot of confusion i was initially learning algebra but the questions were so confusing that's why i left it but complaining doesn't seem to work
    (5 votes)
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    • male robot hal style avatar for user Ezechiel
      Hey Mazhar, do you agree that 2/3 is 1/3 away from one ? Since 2/3 + 1/3 = 1. And that 6/8 is 2/8 away from 1 ? Since 6/8 +2/8 = 1. So the question is which one is CLOSER to one. Or in other words is 1/3 smaller than 2/8 ? Since if 1/3 is smaller 2/3 is closer to 1.

      Now is 1/3 bigger or smaller than 2/8 = 1/4 ?

      In fact 1/4 is smaller than 1/3 hence 6/8 is only 2/8 = 1/4 away from 1, while 2/3 is away 1/3. You can also remember that 1/4 = 3/12 and 1/3 = 4/12
      (0 votes)
  • duskpin sapling style avatar for user chipper21114
    Is there any such thing as 5/3? would you do it like this instead... 1 2/3? Or would you just make it 5/3? :) I guess that it would just be an improper fraction...🤪
    (4 votes)
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  • female robot ada style avatar for user AudreeS
    i just don't get what he means and when i did the exercise it just didn't make anything to me ughhh i just don't get it can i just get help plsss thanksss
    (3 votes)
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  • primosaur sapling style avatar for user ehwahrer
    The Best Part Is
    (3 votes)
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  • marcimus orange style avatar for user mayaheller28
    i don't get it. I have failed myself. :(
    (2 votes)
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    • winston default style avatar for user Charmaine dela Cruz
      I'm 9 months, too late! But try this. Make both fractions have the same denominator, if you convert 5/3 and 10/7 to 35/21 and 30/21 respectively, it's easier to see that one is larger than the other. Then you can plot both of them on a number line. It's more tedious but it gives you a better understanding of which one is bigger.
      (2 votes)
  • blobby green style avatar for user next time long out.
    1 twelfth is closets to 1/2 or 1 whole?
    (3 votes)
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  • starky tree style avatar for user TigerGrl
    Why do he do something so easy, obviously 10/7 is larger than a whole and therefore lager than 3/5
    (3 votes)
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  • ohnoes default style avatar for user Sammy Xiao
    Let's see if this helps. 5/3 = 1 2/3 10/7= 1 3/7 you only need 1 more 1/3 to make a whole (3/3) but you need 4 more 1/7 to make a whole (7/7) so 5/3 is larger because it is closer t anot her whole. Let me give you a little trick- 5/3 and 10/7 multiply 7×5=35 on the 5/3 side then multiply 3×10=30 on the 10/7 side so 35 is larger than 30 which means 5/3 is larger than 10/7. Sorry this is so long but I hope it helps.
    (2 votes)
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  • orange juice squid orange style avatar for user anevaeh.cordova
    how do you do fractions again sorry
    (0 votes)
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Video transcript

- Let's see if we can compare the fraction 5/3 to 10/7 or which-- if we can figure out which one of these fractions is larger. And you might notice both of these are larger than a whole. A whole would be 3/3, this is 5/3. And a whole here would be 7/7, this is 10/7. So which of these is going to be larger? And to help us with that, I'm going to plot each of these on a number line and I encourage you to pause this video and try to do the same before I work it out. Alright, so I have a number line, here. We have zero, one, two and, first, I divide the number line into thirds. You see right over here, this is 1/3, this is 2/3, the thirds are being marked off in blue right over here. You see that each from the space from zero to one is split into three equal sections, one, two, three. And then the space from one to two is split into three equal sections, one, two, and three, you see that right over here. So I'm marking off all of the-- I'm marking off all of the thirds. So this is 1/3, this is 2/3, this is 3/3, which is, of course, the same thing as one. This is 4/3, and then this right over here is going to be 5/3. And if we were to go over here, two would be the same thing as 6/3. But what we care about is 5/3, so that's that. Right over there, I don't want to fill it in so much. So 5/3 is that right over there. Now let's think about sevenths. Now to do sevenths I have to split the part of the number line between zero and one or between each whole number into seven equal spaces. So you see that here. One, two, three, four, five, six, seven. You have seven equal sections. So this is 1/7, this is 2/7, 3/7, 4/7, 5/7, 6/7, this is 7/7, I could write that down, this is, one is the same thing as 7/7, 8/7, 9/7, 10/7 right over here. This, right over here is ten over seven. So we see that both 10/7 and 5/3 are between one and two, but which one of these is actually larger? Well we see 5/3 is further to the right on the number line than 10/7. I'm gonna make this a little bit easier to see. So 10/7 and that is right over there. So 5/3 is to the right of 10/7, so 5/3 is greater than 10/7. So how do we write the symbol? Well we always want to open it up to the larger number. 5/3 is the larger number so we want the larger side or the opening on the larger number. Or the smaller side, or the point, pointing to the smaller number. So we have 5/3 is greater than 10/7.