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BEFORE YOU WATCH: Frames in Era 3

Use the “Three Close Reads” approach as you watch the video below.
Use the “Three Close Reads” approach as you watch the video below (next in the lineup!). If you want to learn more about this strategy, click here.

First read: preview and skimming for gist

Before you watch, you should skim the transcript first. The skim should be very quick and give you the gist (general idea) of what the video is about. You should be looking at the title, thumbnails, pictures, and first few seconds of the video for the gist.

Second read: key ideas and understanding content

Now that you’ve skimmed the video transcript and taken a quick peek at the video, you should preview the questions you will be answering. These questions will help you get a better understanding of the concepts and arguments that are presented in the video. Keep in mind that when you watch the video, it is a good idea to write down any vocab you read or hear that is unfamiliar to you.
By the end of the second close read, you should be able to answer the following questions:
  1. How, according to this video, do village-based societies differ from earlier forms of community?
  2. Why, according to the video, did cities need even more governance?
  3. What is a state?
  4. What was new about portable, congregational religions and ethical systems in this era?
  5. What do these changes look like when viewed through the lens of the networks frame?

Third read: evaluating and corroborating

Finally, here are some questions that will help you focus on why this video matters and how it connects to other content you’ve studied.
At the end of the third read, you should be able to respond to this question:
  1. The video ends by stating that the increasing size of networks and larger communities meant that people had access to more goods and services. Then it asks, “was this true for everyone?” How would you go about finding evidence to answer that question?
Now that you know what to look for, it’s time to watch! Remember to return to these questions once you’ve finished watching.

Want to join the conversation?

  • blobby green style avatar for user BradleyW
    1 it is a smaller place than a empire and is smaller than most civilisation
    2 so their would be no traiters or cant make irational decisions
    3 a big area with many civilizations
    4 the ways they travel
    5 shows a bunch of progression
    (2 votes)
    Default Khan Academy avatar avatar for user