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BEFORE YOU WATCH: Imperialism

Use the “Three Close Reads” approach as you watch the video below (next in the lineup!). If you want to learn more about this strategy, click here.

First read: preview and skimming for gist

Before you watch, you should skim the transcript first. The skim should be very quick and give you the gist (general idea) of what the video is about. You should be looking at the title, thumbnails, pictures, and first few seconds of the video for the gist.

Second read: key ideas and understanding content

Now that you’ve skimmed the video transcript and taken a quick peek at the video, you should preview the questions you will be answering. These questions will help you get a better understanding of the concepts and arguments that are presented in the video. Keep in mind that when you watch the video, it is a good idea to write down any vocab you read or hear that is unfamiliar to you.
By the end of the second close read, you should be able to answer the following questions:
  1. Why did the British go to war with China in 1839?
  2. What were the results of the Treaty of Nanjing?
  3. Why, according to John Green, were Europeans suddenly able to extend control over large parts of Africa in the late nineteenth century?
  4. How did Africans respond to European colonialism?
  5. How, according to John Green, did Europeans manage to rule their distant overseas colonies?
  6. Why does John Green theorize that local leaders put up with colonial rule?
  7. How did Egypt end up as a colony?

Third read: evaluating and corroborating

Finally, here are some questions that will help you focus on why this video matters and how it connects to other content you’ve studied.
At the end of the third read, you should be able to respond to these questions:
  1. John Green states that a legacy of imperialism survives today. What evidence does he provide, and is he convincing?
Now that you know what to look for, it’s time to watch! Remember to return to these questions once you’ve finished watching.

Want to join the conversation?

  • aqualine ultimate style avatar for user Brittany
    Why, according to John Green, were Europeans suddenly able to extend control over large parts of Africa in the late nineteenth century?
    (1 vote)
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  • duskpin ultimate style avatar for user restrada
    How did Africans respond to European colonialism during the late nineteenth century?
    (1 vote)
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  • blobby green style avatar for user fanab16
    John Green states that a legacy of imperialism survives today. What evidence does he provide, and is he convincing?
    (1 vote)
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    • aqualine tree style avatar for user David Alexander
      When you find cities in Africa, from one of which to another of which you can fly only by connecting flights in Europe, you find imperialism surviving.
      When you learn that the financial and air transportation hub of Central America and the Caribbean is Miami, FL, you find imperialism surviving.
      When you find nations which, though independent, continue to use the currency of their former imperial center (like Liberia and Panama), you see imperialism surviving.
      When you find nations like Sri Lanka, the modern infrastructure of which is mortgaged to banks in Shanghai and Beijing, you see imperialism on the rise.
      (0 votes)
  • duskpin seedling style avatar for user bryant
    I think is good for are country
    (0 votes)
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