Current time:0:00Total duration:5:38
0 energy points
Leonardo da Vinci, The Virgin of the Rocks, c. 1491-1508, oil on panel, 189.5 x 120 cm (The National Gallery, London). Created by Beth Harris and Steven Zucker.
Video transcript
(intro music) Were in the National Galery in London and were looking at the 2nd version by Leonardo Davinci of the "Virgin of the Rocks". Their is another version in Paris, This they think is the second version perhapse some of it completed by Leonardo assistances and we should remember when we read that. Thats how artists worked Right! ("it's normal") It's not a big deal. They had a workshop and they had assistance. Assistance sometimes helped to complete the work of a painting. the IDEA of course is that the work of a painting is really NOT the actual painting but It's also the " I D E A " Especialy important for Leonardo! So why is it that there are two versions? and why such a long period for this painting? It was started in 1491 it wasn't finished till 1508 and you could actually argue that it was never FINISHED. The commission was started and Leonardo was promised a bonus when he completed it. But the "BONUS" he got didn't live up to what he expected and he [he sold it to somebody else] painting to someone else and he so had to work on a second version and that's what "THIS" is. "The Virgin on the Rocks" is an interesting subject. cause for me I normally think about Mary seated on a throne. in heaven and here we have another way of presenting Mary which is Mary seated on the ground. As a type of image of Mary called "The Madonna of Humility" showing Marie's humility seated on the ground. It also means the Natural world has become a kind of throne or Is it more exhalted than it would have previously been undersood? in other words, I think in the renaissance nature it self has been given a kind of respect. That kind of attention. That's quite a landscape this is not just a meadow as we might see in a Rafael. So maybe we should just actually just focus for a moment on who everbody is. So what's going on here