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Compound-complex sentences

Compound-complex sentences are compound sentences with dependent or subordinate clauses added to them. Paige and Rosie explain how to spot and use them. 

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  • blobby green style avatar for user Germaine Compuesto Olalo
    Thank You, I learn more with your videos..
    (16 votes)
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  • starky ultimate style avatar for user purpleunicorn718
    OK. Hi,um,at how is "I went outside,and I picked flowers" both independent clauses?
    (7 votes)
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  • marcimus purple style avatar for user Lakshanya
    can we have 1 independent and 1 dependent clause in a compound complex sentence
    (4 votes)
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    • aqualine tree style avatar for user David Alexander
      To have "compound-complex" you need to have something "compound", which requires two independent clauses. But, if that's all you have, then you only have "compound", so you need a dependent clause to make it also "complex". Similarly, if you have one independent plus one dependent clause, you have "complex', but nothing "compound".
      (1 vote)
  • duskpin ultimate style avatar for user Lizsie
    Could the sentence also be from , because the flowers were beautiful, I went outside, and I picked flowers after the storm passed?
    (4 votes)
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  • duskpin sapling style avatar for user Dragon2272
    What are the subordinating conjunctions?
    (2 votes)
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  • starky sapling style avatar for user Totally NOT Emily
    But if a compound-complex sentence has more than one dependent and independent isn't that exactly what a complex sentence is?
    (3 votes)
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  • blobby green style avatar for user Samara B
    I've watched the video multiple times but keep doing poorly on the practice test. Is there any other resources i can look at to help me understand?
    (2 votes)
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    • aqualine tree style avatar for user David Alexander
      The other resources will be elsewhere out there in the cyber universe. When I need other things, I think up a good search argument and ask Uncle Google. In your case, I'd ask for "English compound sentence worksheets" OR "English complex sentence worksheets" . Try that, and let me know if you find anything helpful.
      (2 votes)
  • blobby green style avatar for user mary
    anyone have a good way to remember this?
    (2 votes)
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    • mr pants teal style avatar for user Cyrus Parson
      Practice is a good way to make something part of your long term memory and comprehension.

      Aside from this, you can also grab a piece of paper, jot down the important definitions stated in the video, and hang it up somewhere in your room (I do this for certain math rules).

      To remember the different "levels" of sentence structuring, you can also create a visual model that illustrates the basic sentences with some examples, and then moves on step by step. You can think of this as a workflow demonstrating the relation between simple and complex sentences. Hope this helps!
      (2 votes)
  • marcimus purple style avatar for user Erebulu A. Tarela
    the sentence; They say that once in Africa a boy stuck out his tongue so far that
    it reached the heavens and touched a star, which burned him
    rather badly.
    is it a compound-complex sentence? I sometimes find it hard to tell what type of sentence it is.
    (2 votes)
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  • duskpin tree style avatar for user Apollo, Like the God
    So let me get this straight:

    Simple: "I walked along the trail."
    Compound: "I walked along the trail, and I sang to myself."
    Complex: "I walked along the trail, while singing to myself."
    Compound-complex: "I walked along the trail, and I sang to myself, all the while day dreaming of days to come."

    Am I correct?
    (1 vote)
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Video transcript

- [Voiceover] Hello, grammarians. Hello, Rosie. - [Voiceover] Hi, Paige. - [Voiceover] So in this video we're gonna talk about compound-complex sentences. - [Voiceover] So we just covered complex sentences in the last video which is where you've got a simple sentence or one independent clause and then that's accompanied by at least one dependent clause. So, the compound-complex sentence is a little bit different. In this one you have a compound sentence which is more than one independent clause, and also at least one dependent clause. - [Voiceover] Okay, so it's like there's compound and there's complex and this is a combination of both of them. - [Voiceover] That's right. - [Voiceover] Right, okay, so, compound-complex takes the more than one independent clause from a compound sentence and the dependent clause or more than one from a complex sentence and puts them together so you have at least two independent clauses and at least one dependent clause. I say at least 'cause you could have more than one or more than two of either of those. But, it has to be at least that. - [Voiceover] Right. - [Voiceover] So, Rosie, just to make sure this all makes sense, can we get an example of a compound-complex sentence? - [Voiceover] After the storm passed, I went outside and I picked flowers. - [Voiceover] That's lovely. - [Voiceover] Isn't that nice? - [Voiceover] Okay, so I went outside and I picked flowers are both independent clauses. Ignoring after the storm passed, if we just had I went outside and I picked flowers, that's a compound sentence, that's two independent clauses. So then we add after the storm passed which is a dependent clause and that makes it compound-complex. We have at least two independent clauses and at least one dependent clause. So in this case exactly two and exactly one. Rosie, can you tell me about your friend Alberto in a compound-complex sentence, please. - [Voiceover] Sure. My friend Alberto, well, you'll see. Though he has a crippling walnut allergy, Alberto bravely walked through the walnut grove, but he made sure to wear long sleeves. - [Voiceover] That's a good call. - [Voiceover] Yeah, he's smart. - [Voiceover] Yeah, smart kid. So, again, if we just say, Alberto bravely walked through the walnut grove, but he made sure to make long sleeves, that's a compound sentence. There's two independent clauses, Alberto bravely walked through the walnut grove is one, and then the second one is but he made sure to wear long sleeves. But then, again, we add a dependent clause at the beginning, though he has a crippling walnut allergy. That is what makes it compound-complex, it has elements of compound, the two independent clauses and it has an element of complex, the dependent clause, but Rosie, these are both the minimum number. These sentences both have the minimum number of each independent and dependent clauses. So, can we see something maybe that has like more clauses? - [Voiceover] Yeah, sure. Well, let's take a look at this first sentence we have, I think we can add a dependent clause to that. Let's give it a try. After the storm passed, I went outside and I picked flowers because they were beautiful. - [Voiceover] Okay, I see. Right, so this is a case where we see we can have more than one dependent clause if we want to, right. I know I keep saying this, but two independent clauses and one dependent clause are the minimum for a compound-complex sentence. It can have more, and it still qualifies as compound-complex. So that's compound-complex sentences. They are like compound in that they have more than one independent clause, and they're like complex in that they also have dependent clauses. You can learn anything, Paige out. - [Voiceover] Rosie out.