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Linking verbs

Linking verbs are verbs that can connect ideas to one another, like "It is sunny out" or "she looks unhappy". Verbs like "to be", "seems", "appears", or other verbs that reference the five senses are linking verbs. "That smells good." "The cactus feels spiky."

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  • starky sapling style avatar for user ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
    Isn't "the bear smells like cinnamon" a simile?
    (8 votes)
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  • piceratops ultimate style avatar for user TeaganIndigo
    i still do not understand . what is a main verb.
    (3 votes)
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    • aqualine tree style avatar for user David Alexander
      Every sentence must contain a verb, which is the word that shows the "action".
      Some sentences contain two verbs, one of which is the action, and the other "links" or "helps".
      Here are some examples:

      The president tweets. (the only verb is, 'tweet'.)
      The president is tweeting. (the main verb is 'tweet' and the linking verb is 'is'.)
      The president tweets lies. (the main verb is 'tweet')
      The president is a liar. (the main verb is 'is'.)
      I hoope that helps.
      (7 votes)
  • leafers ultimate style avatar for user futurestormchaser02
    So forms of the word "to be" are always linking verbs but other words that link ideas together can also be linking verbs under some circumstances?
    (2 votes)
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  • aqualine ultimate style avatar for user augustllz
    correct me if I am wrong, but if you take the word "like" out of the sentence "the bear smells like cinnamon" the word smells switches from a state of being verb to an action verb looking like "the bear smells cinnamon"?
    (4 votes)
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  • blobby green style avatar for user stephaniebunt38
    What is the subject inthe sentence:
    It is a blue bear.

    Please diagram that sentence
    (4 votes)
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  • blobby green style avatar for user JosiahT
    The "is" in "The bear is hungry" also shows that it is happening in the present moment, right? If yes, that means it's both a linking verb and a helping verb?
    (3 votes)
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  • leaf green style avatar for user que bom!
    Is a state verb the same as a state of being verb?
    (3 votes)
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    • sneak peak green style avatar for user Summerfrance
      Technicaly, a verb of being: 'state' (of being) is a linking verb, while a verb of action, is an action verb. So technicaly they are the same as you asked if the state verb was simular to the state of being verb although I might be wrong.
      (2 votes)
  • male robot hal style avatar for user Shumroz Usmani
    Parvati hit the ball so hard, it __ knocked__ a hole in the fence.

    Parvati hit the ball so hard, it __knocks__ a hole in the fence.

    which one is correct and why ?
    (3 votes)
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  • aqualine sapling style avatar for user Bookworm kinda girl 📚
    Is there only one linking verb [ is ] or there are many of them?

    🙏 🙏
    (3 votes)
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    • female robot amelia style avatar for user Johanna
      There are multiple linking verbs. Often, the linking verbs other than "to be" (which includes "is") can also act as action verbs in other contexts. One way I was taught to identify linking verbs is to try replacing the verb with an equals sign "=". If the sentence still makes sense that way, the verb was a linking verb.

      For example: "Sam grew cold." Sam=cold? Yes, so "grew" is a linking verb in that sentence.

      "Sam grew potatoes." Sam=potatoes? No, so "grew" is an action verb in that sentence.

      Does that help?
      (2 votes)
  • piceratops ultimate style avatar for user Muhammad Arnob
    In a sentence, "The bear is looking sad", the word "is", is a linking verb and it connects "looking" with the noun. And here, looking is an adjective. SO in general, can I say linking verbs always connects adjectives with the nouns ?
    (1 vote)
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Video transcript

- [Voiceover] Hello, grammarians. Today, we're talking about verbs and bears. We had previously established at least one thing about the verb, and that was that it can show actions. But today I'd like to introduce the idea that the verb can link ideas to one another. In fact, we have this whole class of verbs that we call "linking verbs." Or, if you want to call it something fancier, we call that "state of being verbs." These linking verbs include all forms of the verb "to be," which I have handily written out for you. So, I am, he is we are, be nice, they were being, they have been, he was, we were. Now we use a linking verb when we want to connect one idea to another. So what I'm gonna do is I'm gonna divide the screen in half between the action side and the state of being side, just to show you what I mean. So we use action verbs to show what something does, whereas we use state of being verbs to show what something is. So let's bring it back to this bear. Let's think of an action for this bear to do. What is a bear-like thing to do? The bear eats a fish. That's an action. That's something the bear is doing. The bear is hungry, however, is not something that the bear is doing, it's something that the bear is. So what "is" is doing here, is connecting the word "hungry," to the word "bear." It's linking it. Some verbs can be used both ways. They can be used both as actions, and as linking verbs. I'll show you an example of that. You could say, "The bear looked at me." Which is to say the bear is doing a thing, looking, at something, namely me. But we could also say, using the same verb, "The bear looked lonely." Now in this case, this is describing how the bear looks. What the bear looks like. This looking is not something the bear is doing, it is how the bear appears to a viewer. So, "looked" is connecting "lonely" to "bear." It is linking "lonely" to "bear." It is a linking verb. By the same token, we could say, for an action, "The bear smells a person." What is it smelling? A person. But we could also say, "The bear smells like cinnamon." Which, I grant you, is pretty unlikely. Don't go smelling bears. But what "smells" is doing here is connecting the idea of cinnamon, to the bear. The bear isn't smelling the cinnamon, the bear smells like cinnamon. And that's the difference between a linking verb and an action verb. A linking verb shows what something is, an action verb shows what something does. So the bear is hungry, the bear looked lonely, the bear smells like cinnamon. These all reflect something about what the bear is. How it's being. You can learn anything, David out.