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Prepositions of time

Some prepositions help describe moments in time. Learn more and enhance your powers of time wizardry!

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  • spunky sam red style avatar for user Avijit Sen
    Is there any difference between till and until?
    (12 votes)
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  • primosaur seedling style avatar for user eilidhc12345
    Is there any difference between till and until?
    (5 votes)
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  • starky seedling style avatar for user Learner
    what is the difference between beyond and beyonds?
    (4 votes)
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    • aqualine tree style avatar for user David Alexander
      "Beyond" is a preposition of either position or time.
      EXAMPLE: "Until 4PM, she'll be at work at the dry cleaning shop. Beyond then, I can't say."
      EXAMPLE: "To the top of the ridge, the land is all forest. Beyond there, I can't say.

      "Beyond" might also be a noun used to designate a place or time that is far away."
      EXAMPLE: "After he left the army, he went away to the great beyond."
      "Beyonds" might be a noun for "those areas that are far away in distance or in time."
      EXAMPLE: "The chickens were loaded onto a truck bound for the great beyonds."

      What I think you might be asking about is the preposition, used incorrectly. People mean "beyond" but say "beyonds." It's kind of how I often type "afterwards" into something and discover a red line under it, because the proper use is "afterward."
      (10 votes)
  • starky ultimate style avatar for user JACK ATTACK
    Is there any difference between till and until?
    (0 votes)
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    • sneak peak blue style avatar for user 🅻🅸🅶🅷🆃BENDER
      No, there is not. Although, I hear most people use "till" for space (distance), and "until" for time.
      EX:
       "He walked till he got to the  local car dealer." 
       "Samantha read the novel until it was 11 o'clock." 

      "Till" and "until" are interchangeable. It should be noted, though, that "till" is not an abbreviation of "until", and thus you need no apostrophe. In fact "till" is an older word than "until". It's a misconception that "till" is an abbreviation.

      In case you wanted to know, "until" is considered more formal, probably because of the aforementioned misconception.
      (15 votes)
  • blobby green style avatar for user amare1
    Whats the difference between by and since?
    (3 votes)
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    • female robot amelia style avatar for user Johanna
      "By" means something happens before a certain time. Ex. "I hadn't gotten to the store by 9 pm."

      "Since" means something happens from and after a time. Ex. "They won't have eaten since breakfast."

      A dictionary might also help you tell the difference.
      (6 votes)
  • blobby green style avatar for user Elithegoat48_is_my_fortnite_name
    would about be a preposition
    (4 votes)
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  • blobby green style avatar for user TEISHYG
    Is there any difference between till and until?
    (4 votes)
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    • sneak peak blue style avatar for user 🅻🅸🅶🅷🆃BENDER
      No, there is not. Although, I hear most people use "till" for space (distance), and "until" for time.
      EX:
      "He walked till he got to the local car dealer."
      "Samantha read the novel until it was 11 o'clock."

      "Till" and "until" are interchangeable. It should be noted, though, that "till" is not an abbreviation of "until", and thus you need no apostrophe. In fact "till" is an older word than "until". It's a misconception that "till" is an abbreviation.

      In case you wanted to know, "until" is considered more formal, probably because of the aforementioned misconception.
      (3 votes)
  • blobby green style avatar for user sebastian arteaga
    who came up with the word preposition
    (3 votes)
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    • primosaur ultimate style avatar for user Levi Maye
      late 14c., preposicioun, in grammar, "indeclinable part of speech regularly placed before and governing a noun in an oblique case and showing its relation to a verb, adjective, or other noun," from Latin praepositionem (nominative praepositio) "a putting before, a prefixing," noun of action from past-participle stem of praeponere "put before," from prae "before" (see pre-) + ponere "put, set, place" (past participle positus; see position (n.)). In grammatical use, a loan-translation of Greek prothesis, literally "a setting before." Old English used foresetnys as a loan-translation of Latin praepositio.
      (5 votes)
  • blobby green style avatar for user ccolbert37235
    What is the objective
    (4 votes)
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  • blobby green style avatar for user Luke Moore
    is there any difference between at and there.
    (4 votes)
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Video transcript

- [Voiceover] Hello, Grammarians. We are once again learning how to master time and become Time Wizards, which is, of course, what you will be if you master all the tenses of English. But, if you want to become an additional Time Wizard, if you want to get, I don't know, a second hat, because everyone knows all wizards wear multiple, simultaneous hats. If you want to wear a second hat on top of your other Time Wizard hat, that's the silliest thing I've ever said, then you will have to learn the Prepositions of Time. Now here's something weird and cool about Prepositions of Time is that once upon a time all of these were physical prepositions. Like "Before" and "After" just used to mean behind and in front of. They later took on this additional connotation of time just over the course of English-Speaking history. People took this literal meaning of "Before" and "After" and made it representational. This moment occurred in front of this one in time, but behind this other one in time. It's a metaphor. We're using space to represent time. Anyway, I just thought that was really cool. Let's talk about how all of these work. I'm just going to list a couple of the most famous Prepositions of Time and write an example sentence. So let's go through these. "After" and "Before," as we've established, these are time relationships that refer to something happening after. So when something is completed, say, "The bats come out after the sun goes down." And before this occurs prior to some point in time, so it is behind an action. So you can say, "Can you take out the garbage "before you leave the house?" "At" is very precise. When we're talking about "at" we're talking about a single moment in time. We could say, "The vampire wakes at 10 p.m." There he is emerging from his coffin. There's the, oh that's not the sun. The sun would burn a vampire. No that's a little clock. It's got a tail because it's like a little wacky cat clock. No, Bat Clock. That doesn't have a tail. It's got a little stubby tail. Doop. Ah, I really want a Bat Clock now. Anyway, okay. "By," this is a really precise end time, but not a very precise beginning time. So you could say something like, "This place had better be clean by 3 p.m., buddy." If you say something like that, you're not especially concerned that the place might be clean before three. That would be nice, but it's only relevant to you that the cutoff time is at three o'clock. So the end is precise. That's the connotation there. But the beginning is not. "For" denotes duration. How long something has been going on. So you could say, "I've been a chef for 40 years." I haven't, but that would be cool and difficult. But you know what, this is Khan Academy, you can cook anything. "In" denotes a bounded duration. So it's something that lasts for a specific amount of time, like a limited period. Okay, so let's just say bounded duration. So that covers usage like, "In March" or "In the Middle Ages." Both of those things are like set periods. March has a beginning and an end. The Middle Ages have a beginning and an end. It's a bounded duration. "On" has a specific connotation. It's something that happens on a specific day. You could say something like, "On the 4th of July, "many Americans watch fireworks and eat encaged meats." Mind you not everybody eats hot dogs or likes fireworks, so I said many not all. "Since" is kind of like "By" except it's more about the precision of the start point rather than the end point. So, precise beginning. "Since 1974, our company has made "nothing but toasters." "Until" is also precise, but it's a precise ending time. "You have until midnight to rescue the Ambassador, break the curse and save Prince Wilbur. All right. So there's a precise ending there. You have "until midnight," and then you can't rescue the Ambassador, break the curse or save any princes. But what you can do is learn anything. These are some of the most essential Time Prepositions. David out.