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Video transcript

- [Voiceover] Hello grammarians today we're going to be talking about the irregular plural. Previously I had said that if you take any English word, any noun, say the word dog. And you tack an s onto the end of it like so. Boop you get the word dogs and that's how you form the plural in all cases. I was lying sorry, it turns out that English is a little bit more complicated than that. While adding an s to things is the way you usually make things plural, sometimes, there are other changes and sometimes you don't even pluralize using an s at the end. But what we're not going to talk about that now that's for another time. What I wanna talk about today, is the most basic kind of irregular plural, so we have the difference in English between regular and irregular plurals. And remember a plural is when there's more then one of something, it comes from the latin plus. Which means more. As opposed to the singular when there is just one of something. One dog, two dogs. So there is a handful of words in English and it really is a handful, that don't pluralize regularly. Words like leaf and loaf and calf. It's a baby cow. If you try to pluralize these as though they were regular plurals you're gonna return something that is not correct. Or at least is not conventional within modern standard American English right so leafs for example, unless you're talking about the Toronto hockey team, is not correct. In fact, the proper term boop. Is in fact leaves. It is not loafs but loaves. Tasty loaves of bread. It is not calfs but calves. So there are several different kinds of irregular plurals that's why this video is called part one. But I'm only going to cover one such irregular plural today and that is the change from singular f to plural v. So if you see a word, generally that ends in f. The plural is going to become v. You can learn anything David out.