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Activity 2: Theme

Scene from the Pixar film "The Incredibles" where the family of superheroes hug each other tightly in a forest.
Part A: Describe the moral or theme of your three favorite films. Can you identify the lesson that the main character(s) learns by the end of the film?
Part B: Think of a story from your own life. What was the moral of your story? What did you learn and why?
Part C: Return to the story you are developing and try the following:
  • Brainstorm ideas for the moral in your own story (return to the needs of your main character from the Character lesson)
  • Try retelling your original story spine in order to reinforce (clarify) the moral at the end.
A diagram of the "Story Spine":
  1. Once upon a time...
  2. Every day...
  3. Until one day...
  4. Because of that...
  5. Because of that...
  6. Because of that...
  7. Until finally...
  8. And ever since then...
The moral of the story is...

Want to join the conversation?

  • primosaur sapling style avatar for user .
    I have a kinda problem. My story doesn't have one clear moral, such as "be who you are" or "life is not all about winning". What should I do!
    (43 votes)
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    • leafers seedling style avatar for user Flore Baten
      I personally don't think every story has to have one clear moral, which is obvious for the reader to find. But in every story the main character has to grow. At the end of the story, your main character is in some way better than he/she was at the beginning. He/she has learned something, about themselves or about the people or the world around them. He/she is changed in some essential way. In this character-growth I think you can find your moral. Because by sympathizing with your main character, your readers will go on this same journey.
      (84 votes)
  • starky sapling style avatar for user Drew Magers
    Does Star Wars VII even have a moral? Or Rogue One? Anyone?! The theme for Star Wars VII is anyone that messes with you must be killed.
    -Werd2004 #starwarslovers
    (21 votes)
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    • piceratops tree style avatar for user Reb Sero
      Well, some people might say it's got one of the hardest morals to convey in a movie: Even if the world looks so dark, to the point that the textbook hero-Luke-dies, there is always going to be a tomorrow, new heroes, and another chance to make the galaxy right.
      (22 votes)
  • leafers sapling style avatar for user Michael Carter
    Peter Pan: i learn that thinking about happy thoughts can result in great outcomes and we always have to grow up and need a mother's love.
    (23 votes)
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  • starky sapling style avatar for user Faithz36
    Part A:
    Hunger Games: Sometimes you have to stand up to someone in charge in order to protect others

    To All The Boys I've Loved Before: You should tell people how you feel when you feel it, and its good to take risks because even if it doesn't turn out how you want you will know you tried

    Spider-man Into The Spider-Verse: Even if you don't know how to do something never give up

    My story: Emma hasn't always had the best life she has struggled with making friends for over 12 years. She struggles with felling like she is worth anything, she feels almost invisible. Then one day she meets a girl named Alex, and Alex helps Emma realize that she does have worth. The moral is never think that your not good enough
    (19 votes)
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  • piceratops seedling style avatar for user venkyadu
    Aladdin-
    To know what is right and choose to ignore it is the act of a coward.
    Kung fu Panda-
    Giving up is never an option.
    Toy story-
    You have to accept the truth that everything is transient.
    (12 votes)
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  • starky tree style avatar for user -OffNote-
    I'm working on my own story right now. As I've said in my last posts, it's based on a real event. I'm using my OCs instead of the people though. That makes for space to add things that wouldn't normally happen.

    Anyway, I think that the moral of my story is to be yourself, but don't be stuck in your ways, open to new ideas, and let yourself evolve from something old into something new without losing what matters.

    That's a long moral, but it's what I went through.
    (10 votes)
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  • blobby green style avatar for user milan
    I personally don't think every story has to have one clear moral, which is obvious for the reader to find. But in every story the main character has to grow. At the end of the story, your main character is in some way better than he/she was at the beginning. He/she has learned something, about themselves or about the people or the world around them. He/she is changed in some essential way. In this character-growth I think you can find your moral. Because by sympathizing with your main character, your readers will go on this same journey.
    (6 votes)
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  • starky sapling style avatar for user 311490
    Once upon a time, there was a very insecure, lame, scared guy named Todd
    Every day, he goes to his same boring work, where he literally just pushes the letter a over and over again on a keyboard
    Until one day, when inanimate objects come alive, and the world descends into chaos.
    Because of that, Todd feels bad for people and Things alike, but is too scared to use his amazing inventions to help for fear of people not liking it.
    Because of that, he finally meets a nuclear Thing that’s way smarter and very encouraging to Todd, his only friend.
    Because of that, he finally comes out of his shell and begins to use his inventions to help the world.
    Until finally, he is recognized worldwide and, for the most part, finds harmony between Things and people.
    And ever since then, the world is more peaceful than ever.
    The moral of the story: Don’t let yourself stop you.
    (5 votes)
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  • duskpin ultimate style avatar for user kyree malone
    can i make a story without the first act
    (4 votes)
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  • starky sapling style avatar for user Ananya Vasanth :)
    What is the moral to a horror film like 'Robert the doll'
    pls reply
    (3 votes)
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