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5. Rotation

Finally we'll need to rotate object to finish our scene.

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  • blobby green style avatar for user Dennis Haggerty
    Why does my school network consider this video restricted? I want to show it to my grade 8 students, but can't.
    (5 votes)
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    • piceratops ultimate style avatar for user Christopher.W.Lambert
      This sounds like an issue with your school networks IT and not with this website or youtube.

      It seems strange that they would restrict this video, but often a school IT department will use a blanket restriction to block most harmful videos, sometimes these blanket restrictions are placed on harmless videos.
      (5 votes)
  • purple pi purple style avatar for user Aiden George
    When you guys did Toy Story 3, I bet it was a challenge to hide and make the postcard from Emma Jean almost unnoticeable. That's right, I'm onto you Pixar!
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  • blobby green style avatar for user ttsohonis756
    i have been having serious trouble in the coding deformers lesson in the rigging one. stuck on the final step that has to do with x = x*cos(value) - y * sin (value); and the other one for y. i have no idea what to do for it. how do i complete it ?
    (2 votes)
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  • blobby green style avatar for user Leilani
    Tysm I love this so much I look forward to it a lot
    (1 vote)
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  • winston default style avatar for user NANI
    so is the 24599 ok yeah I know you don't know that means so it means that is the sizi have to be as small like the characters
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  • winston default style avatar for user NANI
    O guys I can tell you an answer for the camera if yo wan to do a length for a camera it is worng the hight is right
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  • winston default style avatar for user genlee2009
    whenever I complete a practice it says I didn't do it
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  • leafers tree style avatar for user lz40247
    Hi, I have a question, does the ratio change when I rotate the toys?
    Thanks1
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  • leaf green style avatar for user colin
    How do the Pixar creators choose between the vast combinations of the object placement?
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  • blobby green style avatar for user acollinswheeler
    qwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmnbvcxzlkjhgfdsapoiuytrewqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmnbvcxzlkjhgfdsapoiuytrewqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmnbvcxzlkjhgfdsapoiuytrewqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnm
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Video transcript

(springing noises) - So far, we've looked at placement and sizing, which are accomplished using the two operations of translation and scaling. And the animators really need the shot. They're starting to casually scooter by your office and check in on your progress. Assembling a shot generally requires that things be oriented properly as well as being placed and sized. Orienting an object generally consists of one or more rotation operations. So let's go back to our in-progress shot. To position Bo Peep, we'll need all three operations. I'll start by scaling her to her proper size. Next, I'll use rotation to orient her the way the sketch calls for. And finally, I'll position her using translation. We saw earlier that there are simple formulas involving multiplication and addition for the operations of scaling and translation. The formulas for rotation are a little more complicated, involving ideas from trigonometry. Don't worry about the details too much just yet. We'll get to that in a later lesson. For now, I'd like to talk about why I chose to do the operations in the order I did. Scaling, rotation, and then translation. Suppose I started instead with translation, and then rotation, and finally scaling. Bo Peep ends up in the wrong place. So the order can matter a lot. Remember what it's called when the order matters? ^Right. Non-commutativity. Keeping non-commutativity in mind, go ahead and use all three operations to finish your interpretation of Andy's room. Once you're done, you'll get an approval from the director. After that, you can create as many scenes of your own design as you want. Can you make some options that the art department and director didn't even ask for? Making a great film is all about exploring many different options and picking the best one. Have fun!