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Color grading

In this video we'll explore what goes on during the color grading process.

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  • piceratops seedling style avatar for user Samar Saadany
    So, in order to make sure the colors appear appropriately on as many devices as possible, we stick to a smaller gamut? So, how does Pixar make sure its movies are visually attractive enough?
    (6 votes)
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    • primosaur ultimate style avatar for user Anna
      The film is originally created with a large gamut, then later, the color is 'graded' for different viewing mediums to fit the gamuts of those mediums. The video showed examples of these different grades at .
      (3 votes)
  • duskpin ultimate style avatar for user Hannah Grace
    Is there a reason why it is called a gamut?
    (4 votes)
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  • piceratops tree style avatar for user Vincent Valentine
    This sound's especially hard on Blu-ray because everybody will play the movie on a different tv or computer monitor.

    If I'm making a digital drawing that will be seen mostly on computer screens should I look for the most common gamut ? or I should always work on the best gamut I can?
    (4 votes)
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  • blobby green style avatar for user chao
    I am not very understand it, when I watch film on my computer, which color gamut I see, original or film?
    (2 votes)
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  • piceratops seedling style avatar for user David
    How come lazers can't show pure red, green, and blue but apparently school computers can??
    (3 votes)
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    • duskpin sapling style avatar for user Weather
      They can't as far as I know. Maybe you got that idea from the entirety of the CIE chromaticity diagram being displayed in the video? The thing is, the diagram cannot be displayed accurately on any device that can't produce completely pure wavelengths, so what is really shown in the video is an approximation. If you look closely at the diagram (without black triangles on it), you may be able to see something like dark creases (similar to the cyan, magenta, and yellow "creases" going out from the middle) making a triangle shape. That's because the diagram's saturation was increased so at least the colors in that triangle will be accurate on a typical screen the video makers expect people to watch the video in. Everywhere outside of the triangle, then, the saturation is shown as the maximum.
      (1 vote)
  • aqualine seed style avatar for user helstumpf
    How can you tell the gamut of a computer, a film projector, etc?
    (3 votes)
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  • duskpin ultimate style avatar for user ░▒▓█???█▓▒░
    why are lasers make more pure colours
    (2 votes)
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  • piceratops seedling style avatar for user John Vimal
    can you make the tutorial for how to do that
    (1 vote)
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  • duskpin sapling style avatar for user Ruqayya Ismail
    i understand the diffrence between the projeter and monitotr but how do the programs affect the light given in each film which produces the amount of hls and rgb?
    (1 vote)
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  • stelly orange style avatar for user Lillian Hauser
    So wouldn't the laptop I'm doing this on not be able to produce the colors shown outside of the CIE chromaticity diagrams?
    (1 vote)
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Video transcript

(spring pinging) (ball bouncing) (lightbulb pinging) - We've seen that every display device can represent only a region of colors within the perceivable color space, and this region we call a gamut. But inside the computer, where colors are represented digitally, they're just numbers, and they can represent the entire perceivable color space. But when we send the film to a theater, we need to match the color space of the projector being used, and that's the job of the color grading process. It's to fill out the color space available within that projector and sort of constrain any colors that don't fit within that device gamut. And that's why I'm joined here by Mark Dinicola, our colorist. Hey Mark. - Hello again, Dom. - [Dom] So tell me about some of the different types of grades that you do for a movie. - [Mark] Well, we do the film grade; the digital cinema grade, that's for digital projectors in theaters; as well as grades for home viewing in both high definition and standard definition. - So film versus digital grading? What's that like? - [Mark] Well, as you mentioned color gamut, the film has a totally different color gamut than, say, digital cinema. Especially film, the brighter saturated colors aren't as available, so say on Cars 2, where we had McQueen, a bright saturated red car, we had an issue with the film grade. We had to decide, is it more important that he's bright and saturated, or is better to have proper contrast? - Wow, okay. Any other stories or challenges on films past? - Pretty much any film that has red. Inside Out was an interesting one. It was a very saturated film, with so many different colors, like Bing Bong is bright pink. He tends to go brown on film, so we had to carefully craft the grade for film for that movie to make sure he stayed pink. - So in the next exercise, you're gonna have a chance to explore what some of the different gamuts look like with some scenes from our movies, and we're gonna ask you a few questions to make sure you understand the concepts. Thanks for sticking with us. Enjoy!