Introduction

Now that we've discussed financial aid packages in general, let's take a look at a few example packages for students at Stanford University.  These packages  are not meant to indicate exactly what you would receive if you were accepted at Stanford; rather, it is meant to give you a sense of how financial packages can be constructed across a variety of income levels.

Sample package for student whose family makes $41k/year

First up, we have an example financial aid package for a student coming from a family of 5 that makes $41,000 / year.  This package is built assuming that the student is the only child in the family attending college (if multiple children are attending at the same time, it can increase the amount of need-based aid a famly receives).
The cost of attendance per year is listed at 60,206 in need-based scholarships/grants, covering nearly the entire cost of attendance.  This leaves a net cost for the student of $3,000/year which he/she can cover through work-study as recommended below:

Sample package for student whose family makes $85k/year

Next we have an example financial aid package for a student coming from a family of 4 that makes $85,000 / year.  This package is built assuming that the student is the only child in the family attending college (if multiple children are attending at the same time, it can increase the amount of need-based aid a famly receives).
The cost of attendance per year is listed at 50,706 in need-based scholarships/grants, leaving a net cost of 7,500 and the student contributes 2,800 through a work-study job:

Sample package for student whose family makes $185k/year

Finally, we have an example financial aid package for a student coming from a family of 4 that makes $185,000 / year.  This package is built assuming that the student is the only child in the family attending college (if multiple children are attending at the same time, it can increase the amount of need-based aid a famly receives).
The cost of attendance per year is listed at 8,206 in need-based scholarships/grants, leaving a net cost of 50,000 and the student contributes 2,800 through a work-study job: