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Studying for the SAT for 20 hours on Khan Academy associated with 115-point average score increase

2017-05-08 19:23:34 GMT

We’re excited to announce today that studying for the SAT for 20 hours on Khan Academy’s free Official SAT Practice is associated with an average score gain of 115 points. That’s nearly double the average score gain compared to students who don’t use our free test prep.

Official SAT Practice is free for everyone and personalized for each student. Start getting ready for the SAT today! We think a 115-point score gain can make a real difference when applying to college.

If you don’t have 20 hours to practice, don’t worry. Shorter periods of time also correlate with meaningful score gains. Six hours of study on Official SAT Practice is associated with an average 90-point increase—no small bump.

We’re also excited that more than 16,000 students from the class of 2017 who used Official SAT Practice improved their scores by more than 200 points. Way to go!

Together with the College Board—the maker of the SAT—we studied data from nearly a quarter million high school students from the graduating class of 2017 who took the PSAT/NMSQT and the new SAT in the past year. Score gains were consistent across genders, family income levels, races, ethnicities, high school GPAs, and parental education levels.

Since its launch in 2015, Khan Academy’s free Official SAT Practice has been used by more than 3.7 million students. We’re glad so many people are finding it helpful!

* Nearly 40% of all test takers report using our free Official SAT Practice, making it the number one tool for SAT prep.

* Twice as many students report using Khan Academy as paying for commercial test prep.

Khan Academy and the College Board developed Official SAT Practice to create personalized tools to help all students, regardless of income level or background, prepare for the SAT and college-level courses.

Official SAT Practice reinforces what students are learning in school by helping them focus on the knowledge and skills most essential for college. And it’s free, for everyone, forever.