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7th grade (U.S.)

7th grade takes much of what you learned in 6th grade to an entirely new level. In particular, you'll now learn to do everything with negative numbers (we're talking everything--adding, subtracting, multiplying, dividing, fractions, decimals... everything!). You'll also take your algebraic skills to new heights by tackling two-step equations. 7th grade is also when you start thinking about probability (which is super important for realizing that casinos and lotteries are really just ways of taking money away from people who don't know probability) and dig deeper into the world of data and statistics. Onward! (Content was selected for this grade level based on a typical curriculum in the United States.)
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Negative numbers
All content in “Negative numbers”

Adding and subtracting negative numbers

You understand that negative numbers represent how far we are "below zero". Now you are ready to add and subtract them! In this tutorial, we will explain, give examples, and give practice adding and subtracting negative numbers. This is a super-important concept for the rest of your mathematical career so, no pressure, learn it as well as you can! Common Core Standards: 7.NS.A.1, 7.NS.A.1b, 7.NS.A.1c, 7.NS.A.1d

Multiplying and dividing negative numbers

It is starting to dawn on you that negative numbers are incredibly awesome. So awesome that you are feeling embarrassed to think how excited you are about them! Well, the journey is just beginning. In this tutorial we will think about multiplying and dividing numbers throughout the number line! Common Core Standards: 7.NS.A.2a, 7.NS.A.2b

Absolute value

You'll find absolute value absolutely straightforward--it is just the "distance from zero." If you have a positive number, it is its own absolute value. If you have a negative number, just make it positive to get the absolute value. As you'll see as you develop mathematically, this idea will eventually extend to more contexts and dimensions, so it's super important that you understand this core concept now. Common Core Standards: 7.NS.A.1a, 7.NS.A.1b