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Engaging parents

Involving parents can help to cultivate support for students at home as well as at school. Here are a few strategies that teachers have used in the past:

  • Email parents or send home a letter to introduce them to Khan Academy. Consider including the following information:
    • What Khan Academy is
    • How Khan Academy will be used in your classroom
    • Permission slip if needed (You can find an example here. We used Google Translate to create the Spanish version, so please forgive any grammatical errors!)
    • Instructions for creating a parent account
    • Reference materials on how to use Khan Academy (See the For parents and tutors area within Coach and Classroom Resources.)
  • Ask a few parent volunteers to come into the classroom on the first day your students will be using Khan Academy. These volunteers can help manage the technology and set things up.
  • Hold a parent night during your first few weeks using Khan Academy. Show parents how Khan Academy works, how you're incorporating it into your class, and how it can make a difference for their children. You could even walk parents through the process of setting up accounts and adding their children so that they can participate in the learning progress.

Engaging other educators

Teachers often tell us that one of their favorite things about using Khan Academy is the opportunity to collaborate with other educators. We encourage you to share best practices with your colleagues and learn from their experiences. Here are a few ways to get started:

Idaho workshop

Examples of sharing


I never liked math as a kid. As a teacher, I love it. I love the mystery of it, the methods and the madness! I am really grateful to Sal and his Academy for helping me develop a greater love for math. I love that my kids get the chance to challenge themselves and review their work on a regular basis. I love that the videos really explain the concepts in a clear way. I love that I have more time for doing and less need for telling. I love that I can see my kids whiz off into the math matrix with a huge interest and passion for developing their math skills. It is cool to love math in my classroom and I have had kids log on each week, on average, for about 2 and half to 3 hours between Monday and Thursday nights. The "requirement" is 15 minutes a night. I still want to do more with it - to tap into the application of the math skills in my own classroom.

- Sonya, 4th grade teacher in Idaho and former 3rd grade teacher in Japan